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Knowing Your HIV Status Is Sexy, Says New NSFW Video

November 15, 2013

Have you ever been nervous that disclosing your HIV status might lead to rejection? When it comes to HIV and sex, do you think silence equals getting laid? A new video from Impulse Group, an HIV/AIDS educational organization, shows just how sexy it can be when you know your status. Check out the steamy, NSFW (not suitable/safe for work) video below.



From a nasty breakup, to reentering the dating pool, to knowing your HIV status, to communicating your HIV status, this video demonstrates the power of communication. HIV is a virus that thrives in the silence that results when we don't talk about it. The video shows how important discussion can be in the fight against HIV transmission and HIV stigma. And, of course, when we communicate openly, love and compassion prevail.

This World AIDS Day, if you really want to get to "zero" -- zero new infections and zero stigma -- then it is paramount that you discuss HIV openly and honestly with those that you love and those you want to love.


Copyright © 2013 Remedy Health Media, LLC. All rights reserved.


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Reader Comments:

Comment by: Charles (New Jersey) Tue., Dec. 3, 2013 at 2:25 pm EST
The message of the video is a good one. I wish the two men in the video were average looking guys but I get the point in using fit men for these types of videos. It gets you watching and they hope the message breaks through the visual impressions given in the video. It is totally true that tolerance to disclosure is totally related to one's location. I think disclosure is easier in a big city and very difficult in smaller communities or in a rural setting. Even wher eI live in NJ, just 30 miles outside of NYC it is scary to disclose my status....I've tried only dating poz guys and I have found that just because another guy is poz it doesn't mean you will find a meaningful relationship. I have met some Neg guys willing to ge tot know me and I am confident that those times were it hasn't worked out it wasn't because of HIV.....I know this to be true since I am still friends with some of the neg guys I've dated where it didn't develop into a relationship. I keep hoping I will find my guy, whether poz or neg, someday.....
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Comment by: Poz Ability (Los Angeles) Mon., Dec. 2, 2013 at 9:43 am EST
Yet another media stereotype depiction of gay men only having smooth slim bodies, having or mainly interested in promiscous sex etc. ...in a workplace no less! Good grief people when will gay media ever get it? This video yet again stereotypes gay men. Despicable. Another reason I go to the beat of my own drummer and don't rely on or appreciate the gay spokesmedia .
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Comment by: Ray (Rural Midwest) Mon., Dec. 2, 2013 at 7:19 am EST
That disclosure mantra might be great for you big city folks, but for us out here in the corn/bible/gun belt, non disclosure is paramount to survival. And no it's not about getting laid. I've lived under self imposed celibacy since my diagnosis 7 years ago. My friends and neighbors know I'm gay and most treat me with dignity and respect. But most out here are simply not ready for the hiv/aids thing. I'd have to leave my job and move. I'd even be fearful for my life. Hiv is as private as any other medical condition to be shared in strictest confidence with folks you feel safe with. Not some convoluted badge of honor to challenge casual acquaintances with. Thank you for your time and for allowing me to share another take on the disclosure debate.
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Comment by: Tanner (MI) Tue., Dec. 3, 2013 at 7:23 pm EST
Couldn't agree more with your analysis. I live in a smaller town in Michigan and can't believe the reaction some have had to my status. Don't get me wrong some of my close friends have been great, but even my parents whom I shared it with prefer not to call it HIV, instead they always say AIDS ( extremely educated people too).I have had situations where even after disclosure they said no worries and sometimes without protection ( I know still stupid for me) and later said I didn't. So I worry that rumors, lies and/or legal reprecutions will be result. It has taken me time to get comfortable with being poz and move past feeling like s lepper. I spent two years being celibate and am going back to celibacy again. I think of moving back to the city all the time I feel like it would be the only chance of finding a relationship. Nothing, but Craigslist losers, married, bi- curious, and closeted on the DL guys and in the moment they want, but afterwards I am left alone scared, worried and stressed.Small town USA still has a way to go. I was at kareoke some days ago and a complete stranger looked at me and said, "You like sucking **** don't you!" Then wanted to fight me, had a profound effect on me. He wanted to physically hurt just because he thought I was gay. Thought I was???? Image if he knew my status.


Comment by: Anonymous (Miami, FL.) Sun., Nov. 24, 2013 at 8:03 pm EST
I have been Poz for near 2 years now. My experience disclosing is a good one; I'm convince that everything is the result of my aptitude and approach to the conversation. I'm in my second relationship in this 2 years and both guys are negative.
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Comment by: Evan Hughes (Los Angeles) Fri., Nov. 22, 2013 at 12:12 am EST
It's a beautifully crafted condom commercial targeted at gay sero-different status couples, nice. Unfortunately this condom commercial seeks to promote the use of their product by glossing over sero-different status or the complications of sero-different relationships by says using condoms makes it all ok.

Simply put the issues around sero-different status are not magically resolved by using condoms. There are so many, from HIV stigma to fear of infection that condoms can never address yet this commercial conveys that condoms make them all irrelevant. Having been on both sides of a sero-different partnership I can tell you condoms may prevent infection but they resolve nothing else.

Also I honestly don't see this as a video promoting disclosure at all, just condom use. Further I would imagine this video being very different if the top was POZ and the bottom neg, but I digress.

I can say I do agree with the message of 'knowing each other's HIV status is sexy,' but for me it's because I sero-sort, I only connect with other POZ guys. POZ people sero-sorting achieving the same ends of zero new infections but with ZERO chance of failure. HIV stigma is no longer an issue nor is the fear of infecting or being infected (re-infection has never been proven) and I don't need to give my hard earned dollars to the condom companies. Problem sorted, so to speak ;-)
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Comment by: Seer Clearly (Denver, CO) Thu., Nov. 21, 2013 at 3:59 pm EST
I've found that disclosures, at the right moment (when sex looks likely but hasn't started) and done in an open-hearted, caring way have indeed promoted intimacy and made the sex hotter. Whether my negative partner chose to limit activity or not, we both breathed a sigh of relief that we were clear on what was happening and that we both were OK with it, and the vulnerability of the disclosure brought us closer together and hence more into each other...
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