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Two Studies Among Monkeys Show Potential for New HIV Treatment

October 31, 2013

"Antibodies derived from the blood of HIV-infected people suppressed the virus in the blood of monkeys in two studies that suggest the experimental approach may improve AIDS therapy or point the way toward a cure," Bloomberg reports (Bennett, 10/30). "The two studies, published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, involve the use of rare antibodies made by 10 percent to 20 percent of people with HIV that can neutralize a wide array of strains," Reuters notes (Steenhuysen, 10/30). "Two groups, from Harvard Medical School and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, performed the first trials of these antibodies," BBC News reports (Gallagher, 10/30). "The study results 'could revolutionize efforts to cure HIV' if the approach is found to work in people, said a commentary published Wednesday by the journal Nature along with the monkey studies," the Associated Press writes (Ritter, 10/30). According to Nature, "both teams plan to move their research into human trials" (Ledford, 10/30).

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