Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

International News
AVAC Analysis Examines AIDS "Tipping Point" in Hard-Hit Countries

October 8, 2013

Although "[a]bout a dozen countries hit hard by AIDS have reached a 'tipping point' that means they are winning their battles against the disease ... the world as a whole -- and Africa in particular -- is still losing the fight," according to a new analysis (.pdf) from AVAC, the New York Times reports. The analysis "compares the number of people in each country who are newly infected with HIV each year to the number of infected being put on treatment for the first time," the newspaper notes. Rwanda, Botswana, South Africa, and Haiti, among other countries, are in the "winning" column, while Nigeria and India, two of the world's most populous countries, "are doing so badly that they keep the world as a whole in the 'losing' column," the newspaper writes. According to the New York Times, AVAC Executive Director Mitchell Warren said, "We wanted to find a mechanism that could chart the progress over time, and use it as a management tool, and to make comparisons between countries that are doing the right things and the others" (McNeil, 10/7).

Back to other news for October 2013


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/72900/avac-analysis-examines-aids-tipping-point-in-hard-.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.