Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

International News
(RED), Johnson & Johnson Team Up to Support Global Fund

June 11, 2013

"[T]hankfully, with the incredible advances in HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention of mother-to-child transmission is real today and is helping the world take giant steps towards achieving an AIDS-Free Generation. But still, 900 babies are born every day with HIV," (RED) CEO Deborah Dugan writes in the Huffington Post's "The Big Push" blog. "(RED) and the Global Fund [to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria] envision a world in which no baby is born with HIV, and every mother has the opportunity to help her child thrive," she continues, adding, "But real impact requires action. And money." She notes, "Starting today, a new partnership with Johnson & Johnson means every time someone 'Likes', 'Tweets' or 'Pins' a (RED) infographic, Johnson & Johnson will donate $1 to the Global Fund, up to $100,000. Every cent from that donation will help ensure that HIV+ mothers in Africa have the tools they need to deliver healthy babies." Dugan concludes, "By acting now, and by acting collectively, our chances of helping deliver an AIDS-Free Generation are infinitely greater" (6/10).

Back to other news for June 2013


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/71783/red-johnson-johnson-team-up-to-support-global-fund.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.