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Health Professionals Advancing Equality Warn of Bacterial Meningitis Outbreak

April 26, 2013

Health Professionals Advancing Equality Warn of Bacterial Meningitis Outbreak

The recent death of a gay man in Los Angeles due to bacterial meningitis has the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing Equality teaming up to provide information about the disease.

Bacterial meningitis occurs most often among infants less than a year old; since 2010, however, a "cluster" of cases has been reported among gay and bisexual men in New York City, resulting in seven deaths. As a result, in March of this year, New York City health officials recommended vaccination to prevent this type of meningitis for HIV-positive men and/or those men "who regularly have close or intimate contact with other men."

Four cases of bacterial meningitis have been reported among gay men in Los Angeles in recent months; while Los Angeles health officials have not deemed the cases an outbreak, they have warned the public about the most recent case.

The New York City health department has issued this factsheet for those men seeking more detailed information about bacterial meningitis, including symptoms and frequently asked questions.

For more news on this subject, click here to read a recent NBC news article.

Click here to read the information provided by HRC and GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing Equality.




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