Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

Commentary & Opinion
Center for Global Development Proposes Recommendations for PEPFAR to Improve Data Collection, Use, Distribution

February 26, 2013

Noting the release of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) PEPFAR evaluation and an October 2012 report of the Data Working Group (DWG) of PEPFAR's Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), Mead Over and Rachel Silverman of the Center for Global Development propose in the group's "Global Health Policy" blog "four recommendations where there seems to be agreement and feasible opportunities to improve PEPFAR's collection, utilization, and dissemination of data and knowledge." The recommendations include "establish[ing] and maintain[ing] a PEPFAR public access knowledge portal"; "strengthen[ing] and streamlin[ing] HIV/AIDS program indicators"; "requir[ing] each future grantee and contractor to submit a standardized, realistic, and contractually binding 'Data Management Plan' that conforms to specific PEPFAR guidance"; and "expand[ing] the collection, application, and sharing of budget, expenditure and cost data through the Expenditure Analysis initiative," according to the authors (2/25).

Back to other news for February 2013


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/70648/center-for-global-development-proposes-recommendat.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.