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We Must Act Now to Save the NYS AIDS Institute

By Sunny Bjerk

February 12, 2013

NYS AIDS Institute logo. Image from the New York State Department of Health.

Image from the New York State Department of Health.

Last week we reported that the New York State budget is proposing cutting the State's Office of Public Health by $70 million dollars, and subsequently, a near $12 million dollar cut to the AIDS Institute.

This proposed cut to the AIDS institute is enormous, not only in terms of money but also in scope.

For 30 years, the AIDS Institute has spearheaded some of the state's greatest programs, services, and achievements in the AIDS pandemic, including massive reductions in transmission and tremendous wins in the prevention and education of HIV/AIDS.

Since 1983, the AIDS Institute has lead:

And this is just a cursory glance into the AIDS Institute's successes.

Housing Works, Harlem United, and Help/PSI invite everyone to sign onto our letter urging Governor Cuomo to reconsider these cuts and to save the live-saving services and programs housed within the AIDS Institute and the Office of Public Health at large.

Please read the letter in full below and then sign on to save the AIDS Institute by emailing Terri Smith-Caronia, Housing Works' vice president of New York advocacy and public policy at smith-caronia@housingworks.org.

Make your voices heard.

NYSDOHAI Budget 2013 Letter Final by housingworks




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