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QuickStats: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Disease Death Rates Among Men Aged 25-54 Years, by Race and Age Group -- National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000-2010

January 25, 2013

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Disease Death Rates Among Men Aged 25-54 Years, by Race and Age Group -- National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000-2010

Deaths include those coded as B20-B24 in the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision.


From 2000 to 2010, HIV disease death rates decreased approximately 70% for both black and white men aged 25-44 years. Rates decreased by 53% for black men aged 45-54 years and 34% for white men aged 45-54 years. Throughout the period, HIV disease death rates for black men were at least six times the rates for white men.

Sources: CDC. National Vital Statistics System. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstatsonline.htm.

Reported by: Yelena Gorina, yag9@cdc.gov, 301-458-4241.

Alternate Text: The figure above shows human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease death rates among men aged 25-54 years, by race and age in the United States during 2000-2010. From 2000 to 2010, HIV disease death rates decreased approximately 70% for both black and white men aged 25-44 years. Rates decreased by 53% for black men aged 45-54 years and 34% for white men aged 45-54 years. Throughout the period, HIV death disease rates for black men were at least six times the rates for white men.




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