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Kari Farmer-Coffman: Motherhood and HIV

By Robert Breining

December 7, 2012


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Kari Farmer-Coffman

On Sunday, Nov. 25th at 9 p.m., Kari Farmer-Coffman shared her story. Kari lives near Fort Smith, Arkansas. She is the mother of a beautiful daughter. Kari was diagnosed with HIV on Nov. 4, 2010 and two days later was diagnosed with AIDS. She was told to make plans for her daughter and her funeral. Kari was not ready to quit. Two years later, she is still fighting and making a difference in the community. She is now undetectable. She is a full time student, an advocate and activist, and most importantly a better mother! She knows that she has a voice for this cause and she uses it to the best of her abilities.

Today she enjoys being a Girl Scout leader, and is currently working on two grassroots organizations. She is the leader of the River Valley branch (for her area in Arkansas) for AR HOPE, a prevention-based program. She has also helped start the C2EA (Campaign to End AIDS) Arkansas branch. She is excited to see the growth in Arkansas. She has joined the PJP HIV criminalization state task force to help change the HIV criminalization laws in her state. She has also been invited to join the Arkansas HIV Minority Task Force that meets at the capital and works to change policies and make life easier for those living with HIV. She is excited about her future as an activist and advocate. Working hard is one of the main things that keeps her motivated.




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