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"Science Speaks" Blog Reports on IDWeek in San Diego

October 22, 2012

The Center for Global Health Policy's "Science Speaks" blog on Friday published two posts reporting on ID Week, which concluded in San Diego on Sunday. "Wafaa El-Sadr of Columbia University offered an ID Week presentation Thursday about the impact of treatment on the global epidemic and the new promise of changing the trajectory of the epidemic by scaling up treatment both to save lives and reduce HIV incidence," the blog writes in the first post, adding, "She reminded her audience that treatment has already had a major impact" (Lubinski, 10/19). "A trio of presentations on HIV, Women and Child Health [on Friday] morning told a story of success in preventing transmission of HIV from parents to children in the United States that has yet to be duplicated in developing countries, of options that could make a difference, and, in a look at the burdens children born with HIV will carry into adulthood, of some of the relatively rarely discussed consequences of gaps in efforts so far," the blog writes in a second post (Barton, 10/19).

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This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




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