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Is There Pride in Being HIV Positive?
A Video Blog

By Mark S. King

June 7, 2013

During my new video blog episode, below, someone asks me incredulously if I would actually march down the street telling people I was HIV positive.

Well, actually, I would. And have. Many Gay Pride parades ago, in 1994, I marched while wearing a t-shirt that said "NO ONE KNOWS I'M HIV POSITIVE." This was prior to the advent of protease inhibitors, when many were still dying. The shirt felt like an enormous "screw you" to the virus, to the body count, and to anyone who had a problem with my status.


Episode 42: Is There Pride in Being HIV Positive?

But I have a peculiar lack of shame, or if you will, I'm shameless. And I am very, very fortunate that I can exercise this trait with a minimum of consequences. It's not someone that many people with HIV are able to do. Why? Beyond their personal reticence, there is still an appalling lack of empathy (and education) within families, workplaces, and social networks. The issue of HIV criminalization and the increased prosecutions of people for not disclosing their status only increases the risks of sharing your status.

During the Atlanta Pride parade and festival, I tried to reconcile my own "HIV OUT" status with those who can't speak for themselves, and I investigated a simple question: if HIV is nothing to be ashamed of, can it be something to be proud of?

Thanks for watching, and please be well.

Mark

This article originally appeared on Mark's blog, My Fabulous Disease, on October 18, 2012.

Visit Mark's live blog at www.MyFabulousDisease.com.

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