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Zimbabwe to Allow Trained Nurses to Prescribe, Administer ARVs

October 17, 2012

PlusNews examines challenges and concerns over an announcement by the Zimbabwean government that it plans to train nurses to prescribe and administer antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to people living with HIV in the country. "Previously, nurses were allowed only to administer the drugs after a doctor had prescribed them," the news service writes, adding, "Now, changes made in the job descriptions of nurses by the Nurses' Council of Zimbabwe will see them prescribing the medication." Owen Mugurungi, director of the HIV/AIDS and TB unit in the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare, said, "I need to point out that it's not enough that a professional council allow nurses to administer drugs; this should be followed up with measures to capacitate nurses to do this work correctly," according to PlusNews. The news agency looks at how the possibility of work overload for nurses, a government hiring freeze on nurses, and ARV availability could affect the country's plan to reach 85 percent of the population in need of HIV treatment by the end of this year (10/16).

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