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Press Release
Make Sure HIV Is Talked About During the U.S. Presidential Debate!

September 28, 2012

Dear AU Advocate:

The first televised presidential debate is Wednesday, October 3. With your help and a little social media know-how, we can get HIV/AIDS on the national stage and ensure that President Obama and Governor Romney are asked how they will address HIV in the United States. Starting today, advocates across the country will tweet debate moderator Jim Lehrer of the PBS News Hour in an effort to get him to ask President Obama and Governor Romney what they would do to end HIV in the U.S.

Use any of these sample tweets:

  1. @NewsHour 50% of HIV+ people rely on Medicaid for treatment; continued care reduces new infections. How will you protect them? #DebateHIV
  2. @NewsHour How will you create & employ all the tools necessary to end HIV & ensure healthy lives for those living with HIV/AIDS? #DebateHIV
  3. @NewsHour How will you reduce health disparities, like #HIV from disproportionally impacting gay men, women of color, & the poor #DebateHIV

You can also create your own tweet with a personal story, photo, or another compelling statistic. Be sure to send @NewsHour and include #DebateHIV. Then encourage your friends, colleagues, and family to do the same!

This is just the first opportunity to hit the Twittersphere with questions for the candidates. Be sure to stay tuned to your inbox for the latest information on how you can make HIV a priority issue in this presidential election.

Questions? Email zfellows1@aidsunited.org.




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