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TheBody.com/TheBodyPRO.com cover the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012)
  
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AIDS 2012 Twitter Buzz: So Many Marches, So Many Reasons

July 25, 2012

AIDS 2012 is now in full swing, and that means so is Twitter. In fact, there have been over 40,000 tweets tagged #AIDS2012 since Saturday afternoon alone. All I can say is ... wow. And of course there are hundreds of different topics within the #AIDS2012 tag, so it's impossible to follow them all. Here are a few of the many topics that caught my eye.


I Had No Idea!

People use Twitter for a variety of reasons: live-tweeting panels, quoting speakers, sharing their thoughts and snapping pics of what's around them. Like this:

From Twitter, I also learned that it was the anniversary of AZT's approval, and that Brazil makes condoms from Amazon latex. In less awesome news, I found out how little funding goes to affected populations.


March to End AIDS

What would an International AIDS Conference be without a massive protest? Today was also the massive March to End AIDS, which united five different branches of activists: a treatment activist march; a group seeking "Robin Hood" taxes to fund AIDS care; a branch protesting policies that don't allow funding for syringe exchange programs; a march for gender equality and women's rights; and a harm reduction branch that included decriminalization and access to housing among its issues.

Of course such a large march was popular on Twitter -- and especially popular with Twitpics. Like, for example, these:





HIV and Gender

In the U.S., HIV is still sometimes treated as a gay man's disease, but AIDS 2012 and the events around it have reminded everyone that women have to deal with HIV, too. The discussion of gender, sex, and HIV on Twitter went well beyond just the protest, and served as a reminder that female sex workers, mothers and all other women need prevention and treatment services, too.

People took to Twitter to discuss a lot of aspects of HIV and gender, from reproductive rights to sex positivity, and to ask a still-vital question:


Take Aways

What are people taking out of these sessions and this whole conference? Well ...




An Optimistic Note to End On

Becky Allen is the site manager for TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com.

Follow Becky on Twitter: @BeckyAtTheBody.


Copyright © 2012 Remedy Health Media, LLC. All rights reserved.



  
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AIDS 2012 News & Features on TheBody.com

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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.


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