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AIDS 2012 Update: President Obama's Absence Is Not a Cause for Outrage

By Candace Y.A. Montague

July 20, 2012

President Obama won't be there. But his work will.

President Obama won't be there. But his work will.

The White House announced that President Obama will not be in attendance at the International AIDS Conference next week. Instead he will send a video message. Some critics say that this is a bad move on his part. The chance to meet and greet hundreds of foreign dignitaries and leading researchers at a conference about a disease that is affecting millions around the world is a prime opportunity. This kind of move can be viewed as bad politics. However, this Examiner would like to point out a few important details that show that President Obama is not exactly ignoring AIDS like one would assume because of this absence.

The points in this list are significant and should not be ignored. One could conceive this truancy of sorts as a slap in the face. There have been legitimate questions asked about his track record with HIV/AIDS. But I simply cannot ignore these points and other efforts to fight HIV that have not been spotlighted by the media. It’s going to take more than a missed opportunity at the IAC for this Examiner to lose faith in him when it comes to fighting AIDS. President Obama may be absent for the conference but his presence will definitely be felt based on his video appearance and his record of accomplishments.

Just my two cents.

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