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Guide to Clinical Trials for People With Hepatitis C

By Tracy Swan and Matt Sharp

August 2011

Guide to Clinical Trials for People With Hepatitis C.

There are many new hepatitis C drugs being studied in clinical trials. People with hepatitis C have many options to choose from. Whether you have hepatitis C or another medical condition, deciding to participate in a clinical trial can be complicated. Having more information can help you decide whether or not to participate in a clinical trial, and which trial, or trials, may be right for you.

Some people are comfortable with a doctor's recommendation, while others prefer to make their own decision about whether to participate in a clinical trial, and which trial is best for them. If you want to look for clinical trials or find out more about them, information is available online at www.clinicaltrials.gov.

The information in this guide is important because:

The risks and benefits of enrolling in a clinical trial may depend on the type and stage of your hepatitis C, the drug or drugs that are being studied, as well as personal considerations.

This guide has eight sections:

Section 1. About Clinical Trials

Section 2. About Hepatitis C

Section 3. About Hepatitis C Treatment

Section 4. About Drug Resistance and Treatment Adherence

Section 5. About Side Effects

Section 6. About New HCV Drugs and Treatment Strategies

Section 7. Deciding to Participate in a Clinical Trial

Section 8. Questions

Download this guide in English. (PDF)

Download this guide in Spanish. (PDF)




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