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Guide to HIV, Pregnancy and Women's Health: Tips to Help Adherence

By Polly Clayden

March 2013

First of all, get all the information on what you will need to do before you start treatment:

Divide up your day's drugs each morning and use a pillbox. Then you can always check whether you have missed a dose.

Take extra drugs if you go away for a few days.

Keep a small supply where you may need them in an emergency. For example, in your car, at work or at a friend's.

Get friends to help you remember difficult dose times or when you go out at night.

If you have a mobile phone with a calendar, you can set the calendar to remind you to take your pills at the same time everyday.

If you have a computer, you can set the computer calendar to remind you at the same time each day.

If you need an online calendar service, like Google, you can set it to remind you every day. Some online calendars, including Google, can sms you at the same time every day.

Ask people already on treatment what they do. How well are they managing?

Most treatment centres can arrange for you to talk to someone who is already taking the same treatment if you think that would help.

Make sure that you contact your hospital or clinic if you have serious difficulties with side effects. Staff members there can help and discuss switching treatment if necessary.


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