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IN THE LIFE Spotlights HIV/AIDS at 30

By Kellee Terrell

December 6, 2011

In honor of World AIDS Day, IN THE LIFE, an award winning LGBT documentary series, rolled out its "30 Years Positive" episode on Dec. 1. The episode highlights topics such as the 30th anniversary of the epidemic, the U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy, and interviews from such advocates and major players as Marjorie J. Hill, Ph.D., the chief executive officer of Gay Men's Health Crisis, Gun Hill Road actress Harmony Santana, and Reverend Charles King, the CEO of Housing Works.

The episode also touches on recent CDC surveillance data, the importance of getting tested for HIV, and the media's role in educating people about the epidemic. An In the Life Media press release stated:

30 years after the first AIDS case was reported in the United States, more than a million Americans are HIV positive. The most recent statistics report that one in five HIV-positive Americans don't know they are HIV positive, and that 56,000 are newly infected each year. However, mainstream media coverage has given little attention to the epidemic's ongoing impact. Says Marjorie J. Hill, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of GMHC, in the episode: "We've been able to stabilize the HIV epidemic -- not stop, not reduce -- stabilize."

View the episode in full below:

Kellee Terrell is the former news editor for TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com.

Follow Kellee on Twitter: @kelleent.


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