Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

25 Things You Need to Do if You Have HIV

June 2011

 < Prev  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  Next > 


16. Practice good heart health, including exercise, diet, quitting smoking, and getting your cholesterol and triglycerides measured regularly.

  • Average score: 4.13 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 43%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 78%
Advertisement

Everyone -- with and without HIV -- should adopt a lifestyle that promotes good heart health. That's especially true for HIV-positive people, who run a higher risk of heart disease than people in the general population.1,2 Heart disease accounts for about one third of serious non-AIDS conditions in people with HIV and at least 10% of deaths.3 In addition, certain HIV medications raise to the risk of heart disease.1,3 However, steady HIV control through antiretroviral therapy lowers the risk of heart disease.3,4

Factors that raise the risk of heart disease in people with and without HIV include male gender, age 45 and older in men at 55 and older in women, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and a family history of heart disease.5

A heart-healthy lifestyle includes a balanced diet, regular exercise, and quitting smoking (see point 5 above). Checking blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) regularly has become a standard and ongoing part of HIV care.5,6

References

  1. Currier JS, Lundgren JD, Carr A, et al. Epidemiological evidence for cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients and relationship to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Circulation. 2008;118:e29-e35.
  2. Triant VA, Lee H, Hadigan C, Grinspoon SK. Increased acute myocardial infarction rates and cardiovascular risk factors among patients with human immunodeficiency virus disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007;92:2506-2512.
  3. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. January 10, 2011. www.aidsinfo.nih.gov/ContentFiles/AdultandAdolescentGL.pdf. Accessed June 17, 2011.
  4. El-Sadr WM, Lundgren JD, Neaton JD, et al. CD4+ count-guided interruption of antiretroviral treatment. N Engl J Med. 2006;355:2283-2296.
  5. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. Pages 321-331. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.
  6. Aberg JA, Kaplan JE, Libman H, et al; HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus: 2009 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49:651–681. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/5/651.full. Accessed May 19, 2011.


17. When you start HIV care, get a resistance test regardless of whether you plan to start HIV medications immediately. Then get a resistance test when you start HIV medications or if your antiretroviral combination fails.

  • Average score: 4.05 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 38%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 71%

Resistance testing is the only way to tell if certain HIV medications (antiretrovirals) can help control your HIV. Regardless of whether you have already taken antiretrovirals, your HIV may be resistant to certain HIV medications -- because you can be infected with alreadyresistant virus. That's why US antiretroviral experts recommend a resistance test when you enter care (whether or not you start treatment then), when you start antiretrovirals, and if your antiretroviral combination fails.1,2

References

  1. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. January 10, 2011. www.aidsinfo.nih.gov/ContentFiles/AdultandAdolescentGL.pdf. Accessed June 17, 2011.
  2. Aberg JA, Kaplan JE, Libman H, et al; HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus: 2009 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49:651–681. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/5/651.full. Accessed May 19, 2011.


18. Get a Pap test for cervical cancer (an AIDS cancer) as often as your health care provider recommends.

  • Average score: 3.91 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 35%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 71%

Pap testing can detect cervical infection, cervical cancer, and cervical changes that may lead to cervical cancer, an AIDS cancer. Chances of curing cervical cancer are high if it is caught early.

HIV experts recommend cervical Pap testing twice in the first year of HIV care and, if results are normal, every year after that.1,2 Some HIV experts also recommend an anal Pap test for women and men to detect signs of anal cancer.1

Women can learn more about Pap testing at the Womenshealth Website link below.3

References

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. Pages 377-382. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.
  2. Aberg JA, Kaplan JE, Libman H, et al; HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus: 2009 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49:651–681. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/5/651.full. Accessed May 19, 2011.
  3. Womenshealth.gov. Pap test. Frequently asked questions. http://womenshealth.gov/faq/pap-test.cfm#pap01. Accessed June 18, 2011.
 < Prev  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  Next > 


  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

This article was provided by The Center for AIDS. Visit CFA's website to find out more about their activities and publications.
 
See Also
More on HIV/AIDS Basics

No comments have been made.
 

Add Your Comment:
(Please note: Your name and comment will be public, and may even show up in
Internet search results. Be careful when providing personal information! Before
adding your comment, please read TheBody.com's Comment Policy.)

Your Name:


Your Location:

(ex: San Francisco, CA)

Your Comment:

Characters remaining:

Tools
 

Advertisement