Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

25 Things You Need to Do if You Have HIV

June 2011

 < Prev  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  Next > 


7. Get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including syphilis, gonorrhea, human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia, and Trichomonas, and learn the signs and symptoms of STIs. Sexually active people, especially those with multiple partners, may need regular STI testing.

  • Average score: 4.50 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 55%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 96%
Advertisement

If you are sexually active, your provider will probably recommend regular tests for STIs, such as the ones listed above.1,2 Avoiding STIs is important because they may make you sick, require additional treatment, complicate your HIV care, and raise the risk of acquiring or transmitting additional STIs.

Sexually active people always run the risk of picking up new STIs, especially if they have sex without condoms. Knowing the symptoms of STIs will help you spot them early and get prompt care from your HIV provider.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common STI in the United States. It can cause cervical cancer, anal cancer, penile cancer, and other cancers.3 There is a vaccine to protect you from HPV infection (www.gardasil.com/). Other common STIs are syphilis, gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and Trichomonas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has helpful fact sheets on many STIs, including bacterial vaginosis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, hepatitis, genital herpes, syphilis, and trichomoniasis.4

Having sex with a condom protects you from many STIs. US Health Resources and Services Administration guidelines on HIV care include advice on using both male and female condoms.5

References

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.
  2. Aberg JA, Kaplan JE, Libman H, et al; HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus: 2009 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49:651–681. See Table 4. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/5/651.full. Accessed May 19, 2011.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Genital HPV infection fact sheet. www.cdc.gov/std/. Accessed June 22, 2011.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). www.cdc.gov/std/. Accessed June 22, 2011.
  5. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. Pages 138-139. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.


8. Tell your HIV provider about all other drugs, dietary or herbal supplements, and nutrients you take. Talk to your HIV provider before starting or stopping any drugs, supplements, or nutrients.

  • Average score: 4.46 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 58%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 91%

Many drugs, as well as supplements and nutrients you can get without a prescription, can raise or lower levels of your antiretrovirals (HIV medications).1,2 High antiretroviral levels raise the risk of side effects; low antiretroviral levels may not control your HIV.

Tell your HIV provider about all other drugs, supplements, or nutrients you take. And tell your provider whenever you're considering stopping or starting a nonprescription supplement or nutrient.

References

  1. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. January 10, 2011. www.aidsinfo.nih.gov/ContentFiles/AdultandAdolescentGL.pdf. Accessed June 17, 2011.
  2. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.


9. Depression (feeling sad or unmotivated much of the time) can be a serious medical problem -- it is not a sign of weakness. Discuss depression with your HIV provider and decide whether you may benefit from drug therapy or counseling for depression.

  • Average score: 4.46 (with 5 the highest and 1 the lowest)
  • Percentage voting 5: 54%
  • Percentage voting 4 or 5: 92%

HIV infection and the problems it causes often lead to depression. If you often feel sad or unmotivated, talk to your HIV provider about these feelings. Depression is not a sign of weakness or something that can be ignored in hopes that it will go away. Depression is an illness that can be treated with counseling, drugs, or both, and your provider can help you decide whether you may benefit from such treatment.1,2

Major depression may lead to poor pill-taking habits and impair your commitment to staying healthy in many other ways. You may feel depression as sadness, lack of interest or pleasure in activities, fatigue, decreased ability to concentrate, appetite changes, sleeplessness, hopelessness, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, or thoughts of death or suicide.1

The National Institute of Mental Health has several useful, easy-to-read publications on depression in English and en Español: www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-listing.shtml.

References

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Guide for HIV/AIDS clinical care. January 2011. Pages 543-552. http://hab.hrsa.gov/deliverhivaidscare/clinicalguide11/pdf/p07-cg/CM_Jan2011.pdf. Accessed June 20, 2011.
  2. Aberg JA, Kaplan JE, Libman H, et al; HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus: 2009 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49:651–681. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/5/651.full. Accessed May 19, 2011.
     < Prev  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  Next > 


  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

This article was provided by The Center for AIDS. Visit CFA's website to find out more about their activities and publications.
 
See Also
More on HIV/AIDS Basics

No comments have been made.
 

Add Your Comment:
(Please note: Your name and comment will be public, and may even show up in
Internet search results. Be careful when providing personal information! Before
adding your comment, please read TheBody.com's Comment Policy.)

Your Name:


Your Location:

(ex: San Francisco, CA)

Your Comment:

Characters remaining:

Tools
 

Advertisement