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Transitioning Lead Responsibilities From U.S. to South Africa in the Countries' Partnership Against HIV/AIDS

September 8, 2011

In this Center for Strategic & International Studies "Smart Global Health" blog post, J. Stephen Morrison, senior vice president of CSIS and director of the Global Health Policy Center at CSIS, outlines "five key steps that the U.S. can take, in close partnership with South Africa, to reduce ... risks and raise the prospects of success" as the countries undergo a transition in lead responsibilities from the U.S. to South Africa in their partnership against HIV/AIDS in South Africa, a transition that Morrison writes is "highly fraught with risks." The steps include increasing transparency of PEPFAR spending, strengthening U.S.-South African negotiating teams, outlining a five-year transition plan, developing an effective communications strategy, and elevating prevention as a strategic priority, according to the blog (9/7).

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