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HIV Among Women

March 10, 2016

Fast Facts
  • Around 1 in 4 people living with HIV in the United States are women.
  • Most new HIV diagnoses in women are attributed to heterosexual sex.
  • Between 2005 and 2014, the number of new HIV diagnoses among women declined 40%.


HIV Among Women
Black/African American1 and Hispanic/Latina2 women continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV, compared with women of other races/ethnicities. Of the total estimated number of women3 living with diagnosed HIV at the end of 2013, 61% (137,504) were African American, 17% (39,177) were white, and 17% (38,664) were Hispanics/Latinas.


The Numbers

New HIV Infections4


Estimates of New HIV Infections in the United States for the Most-Affected Subpopulations, 2014

Estimates of New HIV Infections in the United States for the Most-Affected Subpopulations, 2014

Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2014. HIV Surveillance Report 2015;26. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2014. HIV Surveillance Report 2015;26. Subpopulations representing 2% or less of HIV diagnoses are not reflected in this chart. Abbreviation: MSM = men who have sex with men.


Prevention Challenges


What CDC Is Doing

Through its high-impact prevention approach, CDC is working with state and local partners throughout the United States to identify and implement the most cost-effective and scalable interventions in the geographic areas and populations most affected by HIV. Activities include:


Footnotes

  1. Referred to as African American in this fact sheet.
  2. Hispanics/Latinas can be of any race.
  3. Adult and adolescent females aged 13 and older.
  4. HIV and AIDS diagnoses indicate when a person is diagnosed with HIV infection or AIDS, but do not indicate when the person was infected.
  5. Heterosexual sex with a person known to have, or be at high risk for, HIV infection.
  6. In 27 states and the District of Columbia (the areas with complete lab reporting by December 2014).
  7. A person with a suppressed viral load has a very low level of the virus. That person can stay healthy and has a dramatically reduced risk of transmitting the virus to others




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