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Georgia: Emory University Receives $26 Million to Study AIDS Vaccine

July 20, 2011

Emory University has received a $26 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a vaccine against HIV/AIDS. In a five-year study, the Emory Consortium for AIDS Vaccine Research in Nonhuman Primates will focus on preventing the initial stages of simian immunodeficiency virus infection; SIV is similar to HIV. The research at Emory's Yerkes National Primate Research Center will concentrate on blocking infection at mucosal sites. "Developing a safe and effective preventive HIV/AIDS vaccine is still a critical part of the fight against this challenging disease that affects more than 30 million people worldwide," said Eric Hunter, PhD, co-director of the Emory Center for AIDS Research, which supports more than 100 investigators carrying out AIDS-related research.

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Excerpted from:
Geogia Voice (Atlanta)
07.18.2011; Ryan Watkins




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