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July 7: National Call-In Day to Support HIV/AIDS Programs

By Candace Y.A. Montague

July 7, 2011

Take five minutes and make a difference. Credit: flickr.com.

Take five minutes and make a difference. Credit: flickr.com.

Calling all five minute activists! If you can spare a few moments in your day today, you can help make a difference. Today is National Call-In Day to pressure members of Congress to spare crucial safety net programs that will help men, women, and children living with HIV/AIDS. Congressional negotiations to reduce the federal deficit have slowed down. These negotiations could benefit Medicaid, the Ryan White Program, housing, and other critical programs. Now National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC), AIDS Alliance, and other local AIDS Service Organizations need your help to to get the ball rolling again before the vote on August 2nd.


What to Say

Here's a very brief script, suggested by NMAC, that you can use when you call in. Of course you can also use your own information.

"I am calling to ask Senator Reid/Speaker Boehner/President Obama to prevent harmful cuts and caps to health care and low-income programs, including those that impact persons living with HIV/AIDS, such as the Ryan White Program, Medicaid, housing and prevention programs!

If you have questions, please contact __________________________, thank you!"


What Number to Call

You've got your marching orders. Now hop to it.

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