Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
ICAAC 2006; San Francisco, Calif.; September 27-30, 2006

Key Links:

By Topic:

Search:
The 46th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Podcast Central at ICAAC 2006

We asked three of the top U.S. HIV clinicians to give us their take on some of the most critical issues in HIV, including:

  • When should HIV therapy be initiated?

  • How do you choose an initial regimen?

  • What are the risks and benefits of structured treatment interruptions?

  • Why are people so excited about MK-0518, Merck's new integrase inhibitor?

Listen to each podcast to hear what these experts had to say. (Transcripts for each podcast are also available.)


Cal Cohen, M.D., M.S.

Calvin J. Cohen, M.D., M.S., Community Research Initiative of New England and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
Listen  Listen to podcast (8.7MB MP3, 25 min.)
Read interview
Eric Daar, M.D.

Eric Daar, M.D., Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, Calif.
Listen  Listen to podcast (8.4MB MP3, 24 min.)
Read interview
Benjamin Young, M.D., Ph.D.

Benjamin Young, M.D., Ph.D., Denver ID Consultants, Rose Medical Center, Denver, Colo.
Listen  Listen to podcast (7.6MB MP3, 22 min.)
Read interview

Additional Podcasts

Robin Isaacs, M.D., Ph.D.

Robin Isaacs, M.D., Merck & Co., Inc.
We also had the opportunity to talk to Robin Isaacs, M.D., executive director of infectious disease and HIV vaccine research at Merck. He spoke about the MK-0518 data presented at ICAAC 2006. This new integrase inhibitor has shown impressive results both in treatment-experienced and treatment-naive HIV-infected patients.
Listen  Listen to podcast (4.9MB MP3, 14 min.)
Read interview
Gregory Smiley

Gregory Smiley, American Academy of HIV Medicine, Washington, DC
Gregory Smiley is Director of Public Policy and Government Relations at the American Academy of HIV Medicine, an organization of 2,000 HIV specialists providing care to more than 340,000 people with HIV. Smiley discusses why the Ryan White CARE Act is an "anchor of [HIV] care" for HIV-infected people in the United States, and offers his view on why the U.S. Congress has taken so long to reauthorize it.
Listen  Listen to podcast (8.3MB MP3, 24 min.)
Read interview

Copyright © 2007 Body Health Resources Corporation. All rights reserved. Podcast disclaimer


Advertisement