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HIV Transmission and Education >> Am I Infected?

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ben7206
Newbie

Reged: 07/10/09
Posts: 1
hiv risks?
      #246499 - 07/10/09 11:06 PM

do i need testing?
1. (since october, bt dint really wory till february but stopped 5th of may). I used to stck my hand in my back undr my shirt n scratch pimples like 200-800 times a day (no exaggerating). what would b the risk if there was hiv + blood in every one of these times?
2.(feb 27) went 2 use bathroom, put bookbag on ground n dint touch any part of me till 10-15 minutes later (blood probably would've dried). however, on march 21-25 i had night sweats. what's the risk? is this ARS?
3.(between march 10-14) saw cm of blood at bottom of cut n then bled. what if the blood was fresh n it was hiv + blood n it got in my wound? what if it was hiv + blood that cut/poked me n it was hiv + blood getting in my wound? what's the risk?
4.(march 18) got done jogging, saw a 1 inch wound on my thumb (wide and long) with blood in it. what's the risk if it was not mine but hiv + blood?
5.(march 31) saw a 1 inch in diameter spot of dried blood on my shorts n it wasn't mine. what's the risk if it was fresh n i touched it n it got into a wound?
before all this (around september) some jerk threw a dirty shirt at me. what if the shirt had blood and it got in a wound? what's the risk?
I didn't do PEP for any of these because my mom won't let me (i'm only 16.5). is testing or PEP warranted? n if a 6,7,8,9, or 10 week test isn't definitive but extremely encouraging, what's the chance it changes from negative 2 positive?



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Jackie__Blue
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Reged: 01/20/07
Posts: 1186
Re: hiv risks? new
      #246506 - 07/11/09 08:10 AM

Nothing you are worried about is a risk for HIV. You're mother is right. You don't need PEP. PEP is reserved for people that have had a real risk, such as unprotected sex with someone with HIV.

If you aren't sexually active you also don't need to be testing for HIV. Even if you had a true risk you are overtesting.

A 6 week negative is considered conclusive just about everywhere but the US. This is not because the US is wiser, it's because our policy is set from out of fear and not based on the actual science of the disease. You can thank the past administration for that. Hopefully the US will now start to come out of the dark ages where HIV is concerned.

HIV is primarily transmitted through unprotected sex and the sharing of needles. If you aren't doing either of those things, then you don't need to worry about HIV.

I'm not sure if your concerns are based in a lack of knowledge about HIV and how it is transmitted or if you are showing a distrubing trend toward hypocondria. If you find yourself constantly worried about one health issue after another then I would suggest seeking out a mental health counselor to help you gain control of these thoughts and unwarrented fears that you have.


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allangering
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Reged: 07/04/09
Posts: 46
Re: hiv risks? new
      #246567 - 07/15/09 08:56 AM

Everyone wants to know if they are at risk for HIV infection. Do the behaviors in which they engage increase their risk of HIV? Can I get HIV from one unprotected sexual encounter? What is your risk for HIV infection? Unfortunately, their is a lot of debate as to what the answer to that question is. There are behaviors we know put you at risk for HIV infection.
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Jackie__Blue
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Re: hiv risks? new
      #246573 - 07/15/09 06:30 PM

"What is your risk for HIV infection? Unfortunately, their is a lot of debate as to what the answer to that question is. There are behaviors we know put you at risk for HIV infection."

Those behaviors that put people at risk, the ones you didn't bother to list after mention that there are behaviors...are unprotected sex, needle sharing/stick and mother to child transmission.

There is no debate as to what constitutes a risk and the behaviors this poster is worried about are not considered risks.



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allangering
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Reged: 07/04/09
Posts: 46
Re: hiv risks? new
      #247614 - 09/19/09 09:05 AM

You have risks of HIV. And although many people are having sex into their twilight years, HIV is still rarely considered as a cause of illness in older individuals. "Screening is less common for older adults, who are assumed not to be at risk," the study found.
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Jackie__Blue
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Re: hiv risks? new
      #247615 - 09/19/09 11:05 AM

Do you have some dissociative illness? The OP had absolutely no risk for HIV so why are you telling him he did? His post also had nothing to do with older people and the risk of HIV, but since you brought it up....

The rate of HIV in senior citizens is growing and more people living with HIV are older adults. Yesterday was the first HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness day.



National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day
September 18, 2009



Statement of Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.
Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
Richard J. Hodes, M.D.
Director, National Institute on Aging
and
Jack Whitescarver, Ph.D.
Director, NIH Office of AIDS Research,
National Institutes of Health



HIV/AIDS began its deadly course in the United States mostly as a disease of young men, but today the epidemic touches people of all ages, including adults aged 50 and older. On September 18, the first National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day, we pause to recognize the importance of preventing HIV infection in this age group and understanding and addressing the unique health effects of the virus on older Americans.

Thanks to the advent of potent, multi-drug therapy against HIV in the mid-1990s, many HIV-infected Americans are living into their 50s and well beyond. Also, while the majority of new HIV infections are in younger Americans, individuals 50 years of age and older accounted for approximately 10 percent of all new HIV infections in the United States in 2006.1 As a consequence of these trends, approximately one quarter of HIV-infected adults in the United States in 2007 were at least 50 years old.2

Older adults with long-term or new HIV infection experience complex interactions among HIV, antiretroviral therapy, age-related changes to the body, and, often, treatment for illnesses associated with aging. These interactions affect the health care needs and quality of life of older adults. It is imperative that we in the research community decipher the medical implications of aging with HIV and continue developing more sophisticated treatment approaches so these older adults can live longer, healthier lives.

It also is critical to prevent new HIV infections in older Americans by educating them about the importance of routine HIV testing and early diagnosis; how the virus is transmitted; behaviors that place them at risk for acquiring or transmitting the virus; and strategies, such as condom use and needle exchange, that can reduce their risk. Since early diagnosis of HIV is key to optimal treatment, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine HIV testing for all adults up to age 64.3 CDC also recommends HIV testing at least annually for adults aged 64 and over who have risk factors for HIV infection, such as injection drug use.

The Department of Health and Human Services this month proposed that Medicare cover HIV screening tests for beneficiaries at increased risk for acquiring the virus, including women who are pregnant, and Medicare beneficiaries of any age who voluntarily request the service. Medicare provides health insurance coverage to people who are aged 65 and over or who meet other special criteria.

Aging is an important and expanding focus of HIV/AIDS research at the National Institutes of Health and the NIH-sponsored Centers for AIDS Research. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, funds a range of studies to understand the biology of HIV infection in older adults with the goal of improving their medical care. Scientists are studying the interaction between HIV and aging in areas as diverse as diseases of the liver, kidney, brain, heart and lung; cancer; bone density; physical activity; mental health; balance; hearing; response to antiretroviral therapy; immune function; and adherence to medical care.

For example, researchers with the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study have shown that HIV infection accelerates the development of frailty, a condition of the elderly that makes people more vulnerable to illness, injury and death. Scientists now want to determine which HIV-infected individuals are at highest risk for developing HIV-associated frailty with the hope of identifying factors to mitigate or prevent its development. NIAID and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), also part of NIH, are planning a workshop for late 2009 to identify current knowledge and research gaps in the areas of HIV and frailty, bone health, muscle health and vitamin D production.
Still, many gaps remain in scientific knowledge about the effects of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on aging. To that end, NIAID, NIA, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Nursing Research, all part of NIH, are soliciting research proposals to explain and prevent a spectrum of biomedical problems faced by older adults with HIV infection. More information about these funding opportunities is available at Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R03); Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R21); Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R01).
When AIDS and then its cause—HIV—were recognized in the early 1980s, no one imagined that individuals with HIV infection would eventually survive for decades. Now, with a quarter of the HIV-infected U.S. population age 50 years and older, the biomedical and public health communities face new challenges at the intersection of HIV and aging. In the absence of a cure for HIV, this first annual National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day marks an opportunity to rededicate ourselves to research aimed at preventing HIV infection in older adults and improving the health and quality of life of those who are infected.
Dr. Fauci is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;, Dr. Hodes is director of the National Institute on Aging; and Dr. Whitescarver is director of the Office of AIDS Research, all at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.



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jkkljhklj
Member

Reged: 11/15/09
Posts: 12
Re: hiv risks? new
      #248534 - 11/22/09 02:01 PM

so you're telling me i'm at risk for hiv?!

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