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Anonymous
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Window Period
      #190607 - 05/10/06 09:17 AM

So why do we have so many different window periods across different organizations around the world? Even within the US different states have different Window Periods. Which information can we trust? 6 weeks/ 12/13 weeks? 6 months? 12 months?

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Anonymous
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Re: Window Period new
      #190609 - 05/10/06 09:50 AM

there was a post here yesterday titled the same way as yours that basically said that 3 months is ok...... I wonder like you why so many different ones? if everyone has a different response to the virus then why not leave it at 6 months or 12 months as it was in the past? The tests are better but even though these tests are improved, people still test out + after 3 months.

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cobal
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Re: Window Period new
      #190636 - 05/10/06 12:08 PM

I agree that the test have improved over the years. But the window period is based on the ability to produce enough antibodies to be reactive. The decision on when to test rest with the person based on risk and symptoms.

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SteveR
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Reged: 07/19/05
Posts: 576
Re: Window Period new
      #190648 - 05/10/06 01:11 PM

When you talk about the window period, you have to consider probability. The likelihood that you'd test positive after an extended period of time is VERY unlikely. Nothing in medicine is 100 percent impossible, but the likelihood of testing positive beyond three months is VERY small, and beyond six months it's virtually zero.

I'll post the same info here that I posted on the adjacent thread, courtesy the CDC:

"Most people will develop detectable antibodies within 2 to 8 weeks (the average is 25 days). Even so, there is a chance that some individuals will take longer to develop detectable antibodies. Therefore, if the initial negative HIV test was conducted within the first 3 months after possible exposure, repeat testing should be considered more than 3 months after the exposure occurred to account for the possibility of a false-negative result. Ninety seven percent will develop antibodies in the first 3 months following the time of their infection. In very rare cases, it can take up to 6 months to develop antibodies to HIV."

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