Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
   
Ask the Experts About

Lipodystrophy and WastingLipodystrophy and Wasting
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


peptide diet
Mar 16, 2002

I've just read a story from the CDC news update (11th march) on nutritianal suppliments.

It says that a "standard enteral nutritional formulas with those of an enterotropic, peptide-based formula enriched with n-3 fatty acids" raised patients CD4 counts. Firstly, what does that mean? Secondly, would it be possible to alter my diet to include some foods which would have a similar effect and do you think it would realistically raise my CD4 count?

Cheers

Response from Ms. Fields-Gardner

This study was reported in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in December 2001. There is some history of work looking into both protein supplementation and n-3 fatty acid supplementation and their effects on weight gain, body composition, and immune-related markers.

The fact that they saw some improvement in CD4 count in the 36 patients receiving the special formula over the 38 patients who received a standard formula could be attributed to a number of things. Nutritional improvement that allows the body a better shot at reducing the number of infections and hospitalizations that challenge immune function in HIV infection because of a more easily digested form of protein may have something to do with it. But, nutritional intervention in the form of calories and protein typically shows more effect on CD8 than on CD4 count.

N-3 (omega-three) fatty acids are found in fish, flaxseed, and and other types of oils. These have been considered a weak anticytokine agent (as reported in a study on fish oil therapy in 1996). In a Swiss study in 1998 researchers suggested that the 32 patients who received arginine and n-3 fatty acid supplements did not benefit over the 32 patients who did not receive the additives. But, if there is a benefit to be had, the next question would be: "Can the benefit be sustained?"

Is there something to the supplementation of peptides and n-3 fatty acid supplementation? While the effect appears to be small (and probably a bit more complex that we have discussed), you could hedge your bets (so to speak) dietary-wise by choosing fish as a part of your food intake two to three times a week and reduce the amount of other saturated fats and n-6 intense oils you take in (like lard, vegetable oils, and such). While you are at it, you may as well consider including some brightly colored fruits and vegetables to complement the effect you are looking for!


Previous
Lipodystrophy Please help (facial fat therapy)
Next
Thinking of taking Weight Loss Products

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


 
 
Advertisement




Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement