Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
   
Ask the Experts About

Choosing Your MedsChoosing Your Meds
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


When will I need to switch meds?
Apr 20, 2003

Hello, I was hoping you could give me an estimated timeline of how long my current meds might work for me. I was infected in the fall of 2000; by February 2001 my cd4 count had fallen to 71 (yikes!), VL = 64,000, cd4 = 3. I immediately started on Combivir and Sustiva, and have been on these meds ever since. Six months after staring treatment, cd4 had climed to 212, VL = 164, cd4 = 29. As of this month, cd4 is 414, VL undetectable, and cd4 is 32. I am very adherent to my regiment, only missing a dose ever couple of months (if that). I have never had an OI, and am in good health. Any idea how long these meds might continue to work? Is it closer to one year, or closer to 5 years? I have never found a good answer for this. Thanks for your response, JS

Response from Dr. Boyle

The answer is a tough one since sustiva/Stocrin (efavirenz) has only been around for about 5 years. However, modeled data of patients like you (that is, those who get to undetectable on therapy) on the same regimen you are on indicates that the time for 1/2 of the patients to "fail" is about 10 years. So, you can expect the regimen will last a very long time, especially if you take it religiously. Kind of amazing isn't it, considering how bleak things were just a little over 7 years ago.



Previous
pregnancy and treatment
Next
Changing medication and side effects

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement