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Paranoid guy in love

Dec 26, 2018

Hi! I've become really paranoid and hopeing that you can help. My friend has been in multiple risky situation of catching HIV himself. When he came back home we went out for a few drinks. We might have shared bottle. I noticed he had some (what looked like) dried blood (it looked dark) or a wound on his lip. We also drank some whiskey with sugar and used the same spoon for pouring the sugar into the mouth. Then held it in the mouth untill it melted with the drink. Now I'm worried there might have been blood on the spoon or on the bottle and that I had a small wound (noticed a small red dot the day after) in my mouth. Am I at risk? Should I get tested for this incident? I'm seeing this girl now and freaking out over the chance that I might have it and transfer it to her. It's probably a paranoia but I'm hopeing you'll see this and answer and put my mind to ease.

I wrote this question earlier but I think I put it better in this question.

I'm really hoping you'll see this and either answer or guide me.

A doctor I talked with said not to worry. Do you agree?

Response from Mr. Jacobs

I agree with the doctor. No worries here.

It's important to remember that HIV cannot be spread casually through common forms of touch. It must be deposited directly from the mucous membranes of one person into the mucous membranes of another, hence why sexual intercourse and IV drug use are the most common routes between adults. It cannot live outside the body nor be transmitted through every day touch, hugging, kissing, mutual masturbation, rubbing genitals, crying, sharing toilet seats, sharing utensils, sharing whiskey glasses, beer bottles, shaving equipment, toothbrushes, doorknobs.. you get where I'm going.

I'm not sure what kind of risky situations your friend has been in. I hope as a sexually active adult he is at least getting some routine medical care, including regular HIV and STI tests. But even if he had an astronomically high detectable HIV viral load, he would not be able to transmit it to you or others via dried blood. The only conceivable way he could give it to you is if a LARGE amount of blood gushing out of his mouth found a way directly into a large open sore in your mouth. And even under these circumstances, I know of no reports of anyone transmitting or receiving HIV by mouth-to-mouth blood exposure.

I don't believe anyone "should" do anything, but I think it is wise you and any sexually active adult to get regularly tested and screened at least once a year. But what have you got to lose by getting tested? It's a healthy habit to get into, can help you reduce your fears, and shows your sexual partner(s) that you are responsible and caring. You can even reward yourself with a shot of whiskey and sugar afterward!

On a serious note, there are many misunderstandings of how HIV can and cannot be transmitted. My colleague Roger Pebody put together this article about this 10 most common fears and myths about HIV transmission here at The Body. Sharing whiskey bottles didn't make the cut, but sharing food did. Check it out here: http://www.thebody.com/slideshows/ten-common-fears-about-hiv-transmission .

I'd also recommend reading our resource page here at The Body, helping people understand the ways HIV is typically transmitted: http://www.thebody.com/content/30024/hiv-transmission.html .

Enjoy!



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