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Risk from Licking Belly Button that just came from belly button infection?

Aug 23, 2018

Hi! I would like to ask if this situation was a risk for HIV infection:

Six weeks ago, I experienced a belly button infection that has a white discharge that drains even if I took baths and sometimes painful when the belly jiggles.

I went to the clinic and the doctor gave me antibiotics (Amoxicillin) and antibacterial cream (Muciprocin) for 5 days. The white discharge has stopped on the 4th or 5th day and my belly button was only experiencing a very small degree of stinging pain when it bumps only on an object compared when it was still left untreated.

2 days after finishing the medication, I met up a single mother whose work is a massage therapist. We only cuddled, kissed, and gave me prostate massage and handjob.

In the kissing part though, she suddenly licked my belly button. Is that risky enough for a transmission of HIV through saliva? What if my belly button hasn't healed completely, is it considered an open wound or should it be that the blood constantly leaking in my belly button or her mouth to pass HIV?

Kindly answer as soon as possible since there aren't that much articles regarding this topic. No Hate Please. Enlighten me. Thank you.

Response from Mr. Jacobs

Hi there, thank YOU for writing in to the Body and trusting us with this question. There is no room for hate in education, just credible medical facts that can help you make to feel good about your sexual decisions.

Based on the events you describe, there is no risk of HIV infection. HIV is transmitted from the mucous membranes of one person directly into the mucous membranes of another, hence why sexual contact and IV drug use are the most common routes. It cannot be transmitted through casual intimate contact such as kissing, licking, crying, massaging, touching, drooling, mutually masturbating, and onward.

You mention having finished a course of Amoxicillin prior to meeting your partner. Previous to that, you said there was white discharge. But then later on you said you have blood constantly leaking from your belly button? I'm not sure what is happening medically but if you are leaking blood I'd encourage you to return to your provider.

The only theoretical risk for infection in the latter scenario could be to your partner, not to you. If you were HIV positive, had a detectable viral load, and were bleeding profusely, and some of your blood directly entered into her gums, then she could possibly have a small risk of acquiring HIV from that direct encounter.

If your partner was HIV positive, and had a detectable viral load, and licked an open sore on your belly, her saliva could not transmit HIV to you. There is not enough HIV in saliva to be considered infectious under any circumstances.

I'm sorry that an experience that sounds very sweet and fun ended with fear on your part. If you would like to be more enlightened and in control of your sexual health, please visit our resource page here at The Body. It offers great information about ways one could acquire HIV, and ways they cannot: http://www.thebody.com/slideshows/ten-common-fears-about-hiv-transmission.

Have fun!



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