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Late take of Truvada?

Apr 17, 2017

Hi...i had unprotected sex with my new date..then he told me that he's HIV positive..when 72hours (3days) had already past..i went to my doctor immediately to see if i can still take PEPs...unfortunately he told me its too late i cant take it PEPS...but the following day he called my again and told me that its still ok to take PEPs even when 3days have already passed...so i was prescribed to travuda 30days dosage after 4days (95hour) Now am not sure..if it will still work.. Will it still work?

Response from Mr. Jacobs

Hi there -- there is a lot of information missing here which makes it rather difficult to give you an accurate answer.

First, you don't mention if your new date is aware of their viral load. If someone is HIV positive, and has had an undetectable viral load for six months or longer, then their chances of transmitting HIV are zero. (http://www.thebody.com/content/77932/sex-58000-times-with-undetectable-partners--zero-h.html). This could have been the reason it was an afterthought 72 hours later.

Second, you don't mention if your doctor said why he originally told you "no" to PeP, but then changed his mind. He was correct in stating that 72 hours is the window in which doctors believe PeP would work (https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/prevention/reduce-your-risk/post-exposure-prophylaxis/). It might be helpful to get that information.

Third, you mention being prescribed Truvada, but what about other drugs? In most parts of the world, "PeP" is a combination of Truvada plus one or two other drugs (often Isentress). If your doctor is prescribing Truvada by itself after 72 hours, he may be intending for to use it as "PrEP" which would be PRE-exposure prophylaxis instead of PeP as POST-exposure prophylaxis.

Fourth, you don't mention what kind of sex you had with your date. Were you the receptive partner? The insertive partner? These differences matter a lot in terms of degrees of risk. But even if there was an exposure to detectable levels of HIV, it is very unlikely one would acquire HIV from one exposure (https://www.poz.com/article/HIV-risk-25382-5829).

So whether or not your doctor's directives will work or not depends largely on these variables. Again, it seems like it would be in your favor to communicate with your doctor about these concerns. To learn more about your individual risk factors, you can also check out the CDC's individual risk tool: https://wwwn.cdc.gov/hivrisk/ .

You can also learn more about PeP here at TheBody.com at: http://www.thebody.com/content/79334/pep-101.html. I hope everything turns out well!



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