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4th time posting!!! Please Please help!!!!! :) :) :)
Dec 25, 2012

Hey all! Tried posting this a bit ago but I haven't heard back, so here it goes again!! I have read great helpful posts on this website and I greatly admire your work, I just wanted to get specific answers to my questions that I had. Sometimes, it's hard to get the answer unless you ask the questions directly yourself! :p

1) Are canker sores a direct link into the blood stream? 2)Is it super easy to catch HIV from pre-cum with one of these in your mouth? 3) If so, how much estimad does the chance of catching HIV increase from the 1/10000 chance that oral sex usually is? (ie 1/100, 1/1000, 1/3 etc) 4)I always thought that canker sores were superficial, not so much a direct link into the blood stream? 5)Are canker sores a theoretical risk for HIV or a documented risk? (theoretical: it could happen due to common sense or documented: there have been documented cases where real people have experienced transmission in this way) If a small bit of pre-cum got on this sore would transmission be considered high risk (super likely to seroconvert) or very low risk (same as normal oral sex risk)

Basically what happened to me: I gave a man oral sex while I had a canker sore in my mouth. I don't know his status (whether he was HIV pos or neg). I asked him if he was positive or negative for any STI's (HIV included) and he said he was negative for HIV and all other STI's but I seriously don't believe anyone haha. I tried to keep his penis and his fluids away from my canker sore and swollen taste bud in my mouth (located on my gums right side above my top teeth) but I can't help but think that a slight bit of fluid could have touched the sore and he might have given me something. I also tried to mix my saliva with his pre-ejaculate to disable the virus. Also, he NEVER ejaculated in my mouth.The only thing my mouth ever had contact was his unknown pre-ejaculate. I will be testing the 4th of January. My nightmare will finally be over, I just need some reassurance going in, how big was the risk?

Thanks a bunch and have a great day! Please help! Again, sorry to write multiple times, I just really need assistance! :) :) :)

Response from Ms. Southall

Hi Sorry you haven't been able to find your answers and I hope that I can provide the answers for you.

1. A canker sore is a direct way for HIV to transmit. Because it is an open sore. 2. Oral sex carries the lowest risk of HIV transmission. But yes with an open wound the risk does increase some, but that it's just some. 3.I can't give you chances of HIV transmission in this way, it is still a very small risk as the fluid that needs to enter the wound needs to be significant amount and there needs to be a high viral load. 4. HIV is looking for mucous membranes to enter into the body as well as blood stream.

In your situation I believe your risk was very low for HIV transmission, this doesn't take in to count all of the other STI's that can be transmitted this way.

Yes getting tested is in your best interest not just for the knowledge of your status but also your peace of mind. Again the risk is very small.

Be well and stay safe! Shannon



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