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Please answer my question.Please!
Oct 10, 2012

A week ago I had oral sex with my boyfriend we are both males. We did stuff like blow job, anal licking an kissing. My boyfriend is HIV positive for about a year and a half and I am not. He also have a low viral load. The time we did orals I had a canker sore healing in my mouth as I get them regular an also a slight bruise in my mouth that was healing. The cut was not open nor the bruise. My boyfriend was not pre cumming even though I was deep throating him nor cum in my mouth.

Whats my risk of HIV infection in the activity we did as well I heard of saliva if spit upon the penis lowers the level of HIV, how true is this information. As well I want to know ways and means of having oral sex with my boyfriend seeing that he is HIV positive without being infected.

Response from Mr. Cordova

Hi there:

Fortunately for you, your boyfriend has a low viral load. While that does not eliminate the risk of transmission, it does lower it. The activities you engaged in were lower risk activities, but yes, having a canker sore or other abrasions in your mouth can increase the risk of transmission. Since we know that your boyfriend is HIV positive, it makes sense to be extra cautious. In the future, if you have a canker sore or other abrasions in your mouth, then I would avoid contact with his semen or pre-cum. You can certainly engage in oral sex, but stick to licking the shaft, and his scrotum when possible. By avoiding the head of his penis you are less likely to come in contact with his semen or pre-cum. Certainly do not let him ejaculate in your mouth.

In regards to saliva, it's a predigestive enzyme, and helps to neutralize HIV. This is one reason why oral sex is a lower-risk activity.

I would suggest getting tested for HIV every three to six months. Again, since we know that your boyfriend is HIV positive, it's helpful to always have the most up to date information on your own HIV status. As always, you should be using a condom for each and every act of penetrative sex. Next to abstinence, it's the best way to protect yourself against HIV and many STD's.

You might also consider talking to either your doctor or your boyfriends doctor about the possibility of Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). PEP is a month of HIV medication, that if started within 72 hours (immediately is best), it can help stop the transmission of HIV. PEP can be used in situations where there was a high-risk incident. I would define a high-risk incident as one where you were the bottom partner, the condom broke, and he ejaculated inside of you. Having PEP on hand in case something like this happens could be helpful. Again, it's a something for you to talk with a doctor about.

I would also suggest that both you and your boyfriend check out our forum on Mixed-HIV-Status Couples. It's not an active forum, but there a lot of great questions (and answers) from people in magnetic relationships (one poz partner and one neg partner).

In health,

Richard



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