Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
   
Ask the Experts About

Safe Sex and HIV PreventionSafe Sex and HIV Prevention
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


results from a blood donation
Jul 7, 2010

Dear Dr. Bob,

After a recent blood donation (I have been donating for a few years), I received a notice from the clinic that I had a reactive Elisa test and negative western blot. After 1 month, I went back to the blood clinic and was tested again. Same result: reactive Elisa and negative WB. The doctor at the clinic seemed extremely confident that I was simply the "victim" of 2 false positives. My partner was also tested at an STD clinic just after I received my first results and his results came back negative. I feel confident that my results are indeed negative but the fact that I had 2 false positives in 2 months time makes me a little nervous. After reading the archives, it seems that all the women who had the same experience as me were pregnant and their reactive Elisa tests were a result of some kind of cross reaction to the pregnancy. I however was not pregnant during either of my tests. So, my question is: is it possible that a blood donation clinic has more sensitive tests than say an STD clinic? Why do I continue to get reactive Elisa tests? Do you think I should consult another Dr or clinic? Again, after reading all the archives and from what the Drs are telling me, I do feel confident that I am negative - but the repeated reactive Elisa tests just aren't sitting too well with me. Thank you so much for your advice!

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

A repeatedly reactive ELISA test with a negative confirmatory Western Blot (WB) test is considered a negative HIV-screening test. There are many reasons for reactive screening ELISA tests. These would include pregnancy (or past pregnancies), which can induce non-specific cross-reacting antibodies. The WB test is more specific than the ELISA. It helps determine true-positive from false-positive ELISA tests.

Responding to your specific questions:

1. ELISA and WB tests are the same no matter where you have them performed.

2. You can read more about false-positive ELISA tests in the archives.

3. There is no need to consult another physician. You are HIV negative.

Dr. Bob



Previous
Re:Business Woman - Sweat
Next
Whose co#k do I have to suck to get an answer around here?

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement