Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
   
Ask the Experts About

Safe Sex and HIV PreventionSafe Sex and HIV Prevention
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


QUESTION NOT IN ARCHIVES ; WILL DONATE IF ANSWER RECEIVED
Jun 15, 2009

Hi Dr. Bob, thanks very much for your kind response to my question of the same title dated June 11, for which I have posted the link immediately below.

http://www.thebody.com/Forums/AIDS/SafeSex/Current/Q201985.html

I would like to ask one quick follow-up question (only one, I promise) in order to make a decision as to whether or not I should go in and get a rapid test...Also, I promise to send a donation within the next 2 weeks. (Does your organization accept Canadian money?? Or should I get it exchanged for Ben Franklin's?)

My question is, some places, including the link from this site which I have posted below, state that HIV can enter the body through microscopic cuts or abrasions. I stepped in vomit, and 5-10 minutes later masturbated, and now fear that I might have got infected fluid on my hand from touching my shoe after stepping on the vomit. I told you in my previous question that I had no cuts, abrasions or sores on my penis as far as I know. But what about the possibility of microscopic cuts or abrasions on the penis?? Assuming that the vomit contained fresh, HIV-infected blood that I touched, and that I had microscopic cuts or abrasions, should I be worried about infection?? Or would a cut or abrasion have to be large and noticeable for transmission to occur?

Thanks and best regards, again I promise a donation and that this will be the last time I write regarding this issue...

http://www.thebody.com/Forums/AIDS/SafeSex/Archive/TransmissionSexual/Q9039.html

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

Your HIV-acquisition risk is completely nonexistent. If HIV were that easily transmitted, it would have wiped out the planet years ago. If my reassurance isn't enough for you to shake your worries, get a single HIV-antibody test at the three-month mark. The results will unquestionably be negative. Even though HIV testing is not warranted medically speaking, if it helps to put your (unwarranted) residual fears permanently to rest, it may be worth the effort psychologically.

Thank you for your donation to the Robert James Frascino AIDS Foundation (www.concertedeffort.org). It's warmly appreciated and urgently needed! The foundation accepts all currencies!

Be well. Stay well. (Yes, you are indeed well!)

Dr. Bob

QUESTION NOT IN ARCHIVES ; WILL DONATE IF ANSWER RECEIVED Jun 11, 2009

Hello Dr. Bob, I appreciate all the excellent work you do here...I searched very diligently for a similar question in the site's archives, but could not find one...I think that my worries are mostly psychological, but I also believe that receiving an answer from a qualified, renowned individual will make my seemingly irrational fears disappear. If you choose to reply to this post, please provide in the response information on how I can make a donation to your organization (preferrably a cheque sent by mail):

Recently, I was walking home late one night, when I stepped in vomit (I think just a little bit got under my shoe but not totally sure). I looked hard and did not see any visible blood in the vomit, but it was very dark so I am not sure. Then 5-10 minutes later, after arriving home, I masturbated. I am scared that if the vomit contained infected blood, I could have got a very small small amount on my hand when I took off my shoe, or by touching my leg against which my shoe had brushed against while walking home. Is there a risk here?? (I definitely did not see any foreign fluid on my hands during this episode, and as far as I know there are no cuts, sores or abrasions on my penis)

Also, I am involved in many sports and spend much time at the gym, so my hands and arms are often covered by bruises, blisters, peeling skin and very small cuts. I work as a cashier, and people often spit when they talk, or pass me money which extremely rarely seems to be stained by dried blood. Is it worth worrying that a very small amount of blood in peoples' saliva or on the money could land on these very small cuts and cause infection? (I know the archives say that the virus is not transmitted this way, but what about the very small cuts? Or does HIV simply not travel through the air or stay alive outside the body long enough to cause infection?)

Thanks for your time, efforts and patience

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

". . . I think that my worries are mostly psychological . . . ." BINGO! I absolutely agree, except I'd leave off the "mostly."

Regarding the vomit concern, these types of worries are very common (see below). Responding to your specific worry:

1. Vomit that does not contain visible blood has no chance of transmitting HIV.

2. Even if the vomit contained visible blood, the chances the blood would be HIV infected is remote at best.

3. Even if the vomit contained visible blood and even if the blood was HIV tainted, HIV doesn't live very long outside the body. Consequently the chances of HIV transmission would be extremely remote.

4. Even if the vomit contained visible blood and even if the visible blood was HIV tainted and even if the HIV-tainted blood was fresh, HIV cannot permeate intact skin. The chance you transmitted an adequate amount of blood directly into your urethra is so remote it's nonexistent.

Your fears about spit and blood-stained Ben Franklins are similarly irrational and totally unwarranted. I've discussed these types of issues many times in this forum. Check out the archives (chapter on HIV non-sexual transmission) for additional information.

Donation information for the Robert James Frascino AIDS Foundation can be found on the foundation's Web site at www.concertedeffort.org. The foundation's address is:

The Robert James Frascino AIDS Foundation 1000 Fremont Ave., Suite 145 Los Altos, CA 94024

Be well. Stay well. Stop worrying, OK?

Dr. Bob

$40 cashiers check+ Question! (I STEPPED IN SOMETHING 2009) Jun 11, 2009

Quick question,handsome... I was walking in Las Vegas in some really thin foam sandals. I stepped on what seemed to be semen. I have fairly peeling and dry bottom of my feet. I don't remember if I felt my foot wet, but certainly my sandal was. "If" my foot slightly slipped out of my sandal (which it often does) and onto the so-called semen...would this be an HIV risk if it fact it was HIV infected semen?

$40 will be sent out tomorrow. Good luck in life and love, from me to you!

-Worried well xoxoxoxo

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

This type of question comes up frequently: I stepped in spunk; I stepped in blood; I stepped in vomit: I stepped in "something;" etc. It's becoming a QTND (question that never dies). It certainly already has an ANTC (answer that never changes)!

Your fears are unwarranted for multiple reasons, including:

1. What you stepped in was probably not "baby batter."

2. Even if you did clomp through a puddle of spunk (or blood or whatever), the chances it was HIV tainted would be remote.

3. Even if you clomped through a spunk puddle and even if it was HIV infected, HIV does not survive very long outside the body.

4. Even if you clomped through a spunk puddle and even if it was HIV tainted and even if it was super fresh (guy in front of you walking down the Vegas strip just unloaded his load), HIV cannot permeate intact skin.

So to sum up Sweetie, whatever you cha-cha-chaed through in Vegas stayed in Vegas!

Thanks for your donation to the Robert James Frascino AIDS Foundation.

By the way, I love Vegas!

Dr. Bob



Previous
HIV from operating room exposure
Next
Elixir of Risk

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement