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S&M safety
Apr 22, 2001

I visited S&M establishments and payed for sessions. There is no straight sex (at least as far as I know) but there is some intimate contact. I worry about some of the recent contact I had recently. For example, I fingered someone in the vagina and anus. I did use a latex glove. Is this risky for catching STD's? Also, are latex gloves the best to use? Are other gloves of a different material any better/worse? How can you tell if a glove is durable? Sometimes kissing occurs, is this risky? Can anything be transmited by manual contact? What about the testicles, can something be transmited from someones mouth to your testicles? I know this might sound weird but it's hard to get info on this sort of topic. I'd really apreciate any help.

Thanks

Response from Mr. Kull

Using a latex glove should provide excellent protection against HIV and other STD transmission. Latex gloves are probably your best option for protecting yourself when you are inserting fingers/hands into someone's anus or vagina. Even though fingering is generally considered very low-risk for HIV infection, try applying the same general rules for safe sex and latex condom use:

1) Use water-based lubricants when using latex gloves. Oil-based lubricants may decrease the latex's effectiveness as a barrier to HIV and other STDs. Lubrication also reduces friction, decreasing the likelihood of trauma to the anus and/or vagina.

2) Use a new glove/condom for each contact. For instance, don't use the same glove on two different partners, or on your partner and yourself. You should also be aware of keeping feces away from the urethra (the tube you pee out of).

3) Be conscious of blood contact. Blood can be highly infectious (not only for STDs, but other infections transmitted by blood).

4) Fluids (like blood, semen, vaginal secretions) coming into contact with intact skin (like the skin on your testicles) should not pose a risk for HIV infection. Skin is an effective barrier against HIV. If you are into any kind of cutting, piercing, whipping, torture, etc., be conscious of fluids coming into contact with open cuts or wounds. Fluids coming into contact with mucous membranes (lining of the anus, vagina, urethra, mouth) also poses a risk for infection.

5) Latex gloves are held up to specific quality standards, as are latex condoms. Latex gloves that are exposed to extremes in temperature (especially heat) may be less effective as a barrier.

Be conscious of your own boundaries when enagaging in S&M or any kind of sex. Pushing one's boundaries too far can have a variety of negative effects on someone's mental health and sense of personal security or safety.

RMK



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