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Elusive, lying, techie husband.
Jul 9, 2008

How do I catch my husband cheating when he's a computer guy? He makes after normal work hours house calls on Brazilians & Hispanics (he advertises for that population). I've caught him in a couple of lies about porn on his computer and I have been diagnosed with HPV vaginal warts that I have noticed within the last year on me. He hasn't had them but I have been faithfully married to him for 10 years - so the latency would be quite a long time if his contracting it was as he claims (before we were wed). Since I've suspected anything due to his deceit, I've used condoms w/him for the past 3 years without fail. He's also had skin boils that were pretty graphic, leaving large holes in his skin on thigh. He recently went to get tested @ clinic for STD's & they came out negative and now is taking a med called sulfamethoxazole. He gets upset when I ask him to come clean with anything other than his admission to watching porn, but I feel my hands are tied since his computer repair visits could have been a cover for some hanky panky. Did I get the warts from him & how long after contact does it take for them to start appearing?

Thank you!

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

Lady, you need me to tell you how to catch your "elusive, lying, cheating, techie husband"??? Actually, that's not the type of advice and service I offer. Have you considered couples counseling? A private detective? Hiring Lorena Bobbitt???

Regarding HPV, I'll reprint below some information from the archives.

Dr. Bob

re:hpv (HPV) (Human papillomavirus ) Apr 4, 2008

I have been diagnoses with high risk hpv. I am very alarmed about this. I have read the causes could be from immune system like hiv. I am so afraid of that. Does it necessarily mean that. I have lost some weight recently, and am concerned. Feel well otherwise brigit

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Brigit,

HPV (human papilloma virus) and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) are two very distinct and different viruses. Having one does not mean you automatically have the other. I'll reprint some information about HPV below. Regarding HIV, if you've placed yourself at risk by having unprotected sex, you'll need to get an HIV test at the three-month mark.

Good luck.

Dr. Bob

Human papillomavirus (HPV) February 22, 2006

What Is HPV?

How Is HPV Detected?

Can HPV Infection Be Prevented?

How Are HPV Infections Treated?

The Bottom Line

NOTE: In the U.S., counseling and referrals are available on a national human papillomavirus (HPV) hotline. Call toll-free at 877-HPV-5868 (877-478-5868). Hours are from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Standard Time Monday through Friday.

What Is HPV?

There are over 100 viruses known as human papilloma virus (HPV). They are common. One study found HPV in 77% of HIV-positive women. HPV is transmitted easily during sexual activity. In fact, it is estimated that 75% of all sexually active people between ages 15 and 49 get at least one type of HPV infection.

Some types of HPV cause common warts of the hands or feet. Infections of the hands and feet are usually not transmitted through sexual activity. Several types of HPV cause genital warts on the penis, vagina, and rectum. Those with HIV can get worse sores in the rectum and cervical area. HPV can also cause problems in the mouth or on the tongue or lips. Other types of HPV can cause abnormal cell growth known as dysplasia. Dysplasia can develop into cancers of the penis and anus, and cervical cancer in women.

Dysplasia around the anus is called anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). The epithelium is the layer of cells that cover organs or openings in the body. Neoplasia means the new development of abnormal cells. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is the new development of abnormal cells in the lining of the anus.

Dysplasia in the cervical region is called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). One study found AIN or CIN in over 10% of HIV-positive men and women. Another study showed that women with HIV infection have a much higher rate of CIN than HIV-negative women.

How Is HPV Detected?

To detect HPV, health care providers look first for dysplasia or genital warts. Dysplasia can be detected by Pap smears. They are usually used to check a woman's cervix. They can also be used to check the anus in men and women. A swab is rubbed on the area being checked to pick up some cells. They are smeared on a glass slide and examined under a microscope.

A new HPV test called a reflex test is being used to follow up on Pap smear results that are not clear. It can indicate who needs more careful examination or treatment. The reflex test identifies which types of HPV are present and can indicate if aggressive treatment is needed.

Some researchers believe that anal and cervical smears should be checked each year for people with elevated risk:

People who have had receptive anal intercourse.

Women who have had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN).

Anyone with under 500 CD4 cells.

However, other researchers think that careful physical examination can detect as many cases of anal cancer as anal Pap testing.

Genital warts can appear anywhere from a few weeks to a few months after you are exposed to HPV. The warts might look like small bumps. Sometimes they are fleshy and look like small cauliflowers. They can get bigger over time. Your health care provider can usually tell if you have genital warts by looking at them. Sometimes a tool called an anoscope is used to look at the anal area. If necessary, a sample of the suspected wart will be cut off and examined under a microscope. This is called a biopsy.

Genital warts are not caused by the same HPV that causes cancer. However, if you have warts, you may have also been exposed to other types of HPV that could cause cancer. Can HPV Infection Be Prevented?

There is no easy way to tell if someone is infected with an HPV. People who don't have any signs or symptoms of HPV infection can transmit the infection.

Condoms do not totally prevent transmission of HPV. HPV can be transmitted from person to person by direct contact with infected areas that aren't covered by a condom. To get the best protection from condoms, use them every time. Put them on before any contact with a possibly infected area.

Men and women with HIV who are sexually active may want to have a regular Pap smear, anal and/or vaginal, to check for abnormal cells or early signs of warts. A positive result can be followed up to see if treatment is needed. Promising preventive vaccines against some HPV types are being developed.

How Are HPV Infections Treated?

There is no direct treatment for HPV infection. Some people "clear" an HPV infection (are "cured"). They can later be infected with HPV again. Dysplasias and warts can be removed. There are several ways to do this:

Burning them with an electric needle (electrocautery) or a laser.

Freezing them with liquid nitrogen.

Cutting them out.

Treating them with chemicals like Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA), Podophyllin or Podofilox. NOTE: Podophyllin and Podofilox should not be used by pregnant women.

Other, less common treatments for warts include the drugs 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) and Interferon-alpha. 5-FU is a cream. Interferon must be injected into the warts. A new drug, imiquimod (Aldara®), has been approved for treatment of genital warts. Cidofovir (Vistide®), originally developed to fight cytomegalovirus (CMV), might also help fight HPV. A new drug called HspE7 has shown benefits in early research.

HPV infection can last for a long time, especially in people who are HIV-positive. Dysplasia and warts can return. They should be treated as soon as they are found to reduce the chances of the problem spreading or returning.

The Bottom Line

Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are fairly common. Different types of HPV cause warts or abnormal cell growth (dysplasia) in or near the anus or cervix. This abnormal cell growth can result in cervical or anal cancer. Genital HPV infections are transmitted through sexual activity.

HPV infection can last a long time, especially in people with HIV.

A Pap smear can detect abnormal cell growth in the cervix. It can also be used to check the anus of men and women. Although Pap smears may be the best way to detect early cervical cancer, careful physical examination may be the best way to detect anal cancers.

The signs of HPV infection -- warts or dysplasia -- should be treated as soon as they show up. Otherwise, the problem could spread and be more likely to return after treatment.



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