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HIV risk nipple sucking on lactating woman (BREAST MILK and HIV TRANSMISSION)
Feb 23, 2008

I am 30 years male and had a protected sex with female sex worker 5 months ago . I kissed her nipples also .I felt she was lactating. is breast sucking or nipple sucking on a lactating woman carries risk to HIV infection or any STD s. I got tested at 11 weeks and 16 weeks after exposure both were negative . i didn't have any symptoms till 16 weeks. recently i have small pimples like rash on my thighs and knees.it has been for more than 2 weeks . i also noticed one red spot on my chest and other one on stomach. I use laptop on my lap .it produces heat if we use more time . is it reason for that pimples on legs . do i need to get tested after 6 months .

I knew so many things after I started viewing this site . great work bob.I will be making a donation to your site. THANKS

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

HIV can be transmitted from an HIV-infected mom to her infant via breastfeeding. This is due to many factors, including the quantity of breast milk and the underdeveloped immune system of babies. For adults breast-milk HIV transmission remains only a hypothetical risk. That risk would be dependent on the amount of virus in the infected milk, quantity ingested, presence of cuts or sores on the oral mucous membranes, etc. Overall the risk of an adult contracting HIV from nipple noshing would be extremely low. However, when in doubt a simple rapid HIV test at the three-month mark would give an accurate result in as few as 20 minutes.

In your specific case, your two negative HIV tests out to 16 weeks are definitive and conclusive. HIV is not your problem. No way. No how.

Your symptoms are not at all worrisome for or suggestive of HIV. Plus symptoms are always trumped by valid negative HIV tests!

I'll reprint below a post from the archives that concerns breast milk.

Thanks for your willingness to make a contribution to the Robert James Frascino AIDS Foundation (www.concertedeffort.org).

Be well. Stay well.

Dr. Bob

Breast milk adult transmission May 19, 2006

Dear Dr. Bob, I am the guy who had protected vaginal sex with 3 condoms and then checked the outermost condom for leaks until it burst..Your answer really made a big difference in my life. Remember me? I sincerely express my most heartfelt thanks to you. I have seriously started addressing my OCD and gained some ground in my fight against OCD.

However, one incident about breast milk adult transmission is putting a spike in my OCD recovery. I sucked a girl's right nipple and 1-2 drops of white breast-milk entered my mouth..She was not pregnant, but she was lactating due to a breast surgery which she had done 1 or 2 weeks before this episode of nipple-sucking to increase her boobs. Two months have passed since the incident, and I have encountered no ARS symptoms. I have researched your archives, and you have mentioned that the HIV risk of nipple-sucking is "essentially non-existent" and "no testing is needed". My questions are as follows: 1) Does nipple-sucking remain no-risk, even if 1-2 very small drops of breast-milk enter my mouth? 2) How likely is it to get HIV-infected during breast surgery in a developed country (Japan)? 3) Assuming she got infected during her breast surgery, her viral load would be sky-high. In such a situation, could 1-2 small drops of breast milk transmit HIV? or would it still remain no-risk? 4) From a medical standpoint, would you recommend HIV testing for this exposure? I have had no other risks and I always play safe to the point of obsession. 5) I could not find any statistics on breast milk transmission among adults, but I estimate that the risk should be less than 0.5 in 10000 exposures (oral sex risk) since semen quantity in oral sex is much more and semen contains higher concentration of HIV than breast milk. Can you give me some statistics about adult breast milk transmission via nipple-sucking?

Dr. Bob, please help me to bounce back in my fight against OCD. If Elvis was alive, he would have sung the song "You are the ANGEL in disguise" for you! From a nipple-sucker (now an OCD warrior)

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

Three-Condom-Guy! How could I forget you?

OK, on to your questions:

1. Breast milk from an HIV-positive woman can transmit the virus while breastfeeding infants. There are no recorded cases of HIV transmission via breast milk in adults. However, there is at least a small hypothetical risk. Do I think you should worry about 1-2 drops? No. Absolutely not.

2. Not at all likely.

3. This hypothetical situation is so hypothetical as to make the question unanswerable.

4. From a medical standpoint, no, I do not feel HIV testing is warranted. From a mental health standpoint, if you are worried, get tested! A simple 20-minute rapid test three months after your titty nosh will calm all your residual or lingering fears.

5. There are no statistics, because there are no reported cases. Consequently the risk remains only theoretical.

Dr. Bob

HIV, Breast milk & pasteurization Nov 16, 2006

Dear Dr Frascino, Please help me with your kind advice - I'll be most happy to donate to your cause!

I'm a 30 yo male, and unfortunately, I've always had a breastmilk fetish. I've managed to control this fetish. But recently I flirted with a single mother of an infant and though no intercourse was involved, I drank quite a lot of her milk - 4-5 ounces. I don't know her HIV/HEP status.

The thing is, I expressed her milk into a bottle & then I took a 6 hour trip home. The milk was transferred to a glass cup and it was put in newly boiled water in a kettle for about 5 minutes. This process was done twice before I drank her milk after it cooled down.

My question: Will this be sufficient to kill HIV or Hepatitis B/C in the milk???

I just couldn't help myself. Should I get tested?

Doesn't HIV die once outside the body for a short period of time?

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

Sorry, but I'm not aware of any scientific data that specifically address your question. As you can imagine, the question just doesn't come up all that often! I can tell you, heat or no heat, the risk of HIV transmission via breast milk in adults is negligible. If you remain concerned, get a single HIV rapid test at the there-month mark.

Good luck.

Dr. Bob

sperm is like breast milk Apr 28, 2007

"astronomically in your favor", "1 in 10,000", "negligible", and etc...

These comments must also apply for all the infants who are orally ingesting HIV infected breast milk. I have not seen any threads on this subject, or if there is, so few that I must have missed it.

Please educate us (all readers) on this subject. If receptive oral got HIV+ sperm/precum in the mouth and the risk is "very, very low", then shouldn't it be the same odds and stats for that infant and the HIV+ breast milk? From what I was told breast milk is a MAJOR means of mother to infant transmission, outside of canal birth.

If you could elaborate it would be greatly appreciated, since there are not many threads to compile and come to a good understanding.

motu

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Motu,

No, sperm is not at all like breast milk!!! Infants ingesting breast milk from an HIV-positive mother and adults getting ejaculate or precum in their mouths from an HIV-positive partner are very different situations on many levels. And their statistical HIV risks are not comparable. The old "apples to oranges" analogy would apply.

First off, breast milk and ejaculate are two very different substances. Next, boobs and dicks are also very different delivery systems. Next, breastfeeding infants ingest only breast milk. It's their entire diet. Most adults don't get all their nutrition from ingesting spooge. Next, an infant's immune system is immature and therefore cannot fight off infection as well as a mature adult's can. These are just a few of the differences that explain why you can't equate these two modes of transmission, OK?

Dr. Bob

Med Student Confused Sep 7, 2006

Hey Doc, First of all I would like to say you are providing one heck of a service to everyone out there! I am astounded by your kindness truth and generosity. I really enjoy your forum and always refer to it when HIV comes up in our studies. I am studying to be a medical doctor in NY, 1st year in college I have a long way to go!! Anyways recently I have been reading that infected breast milk can only cause HIV in infants because of the amount they induce. This also depends on the viral load of the breast milk is this correct? You wonder why I asked my teacher these questions huh? Sex worker incident, dont ask. No sex, No oral, just sucking milk from her breast (fetish), and licked one of her breast that was cut and had a scab on it. I know I am stupid, a med student should know better but I was drunk and it was 3 am. Ha-ha. She confirmed it was breast milk because she just had a baby. My professor announced to me that even adults can be infected with HIV through exposure to infected breast milk. He stated that especially if the infected person is still in the 3-6 month window period in which they are highly infectious, he said that this will definitely affect a non-infected person. Whether they drink a little or a lot, he also stated that infected breast milk that gets into the eyes of non-infected person can infect that person with HIV. I was grilling him with questions and this is what I got. We almost argued about the issue because I was opposing his statements, all my readings on this website kind of state that there is no risk. So what is it? I kept telling him and the class about your forum and the website, but he said he stands by his statements. The sex worker had a bunch of bruises on her arms and legs, I didnt see any sign of anything else this led to me to think she might be positive. Now I am confused and need some assistance so I can shut my professor up! His statements got me really worried because 2-3 weeks after the exposure I suffered heavy diarrhea, fatigue, didnt want to get out of bed, heavy sweating day and night, and a rash on my anus that hurt like hell!!! This lasted for like 5-6 days. I washed my anus and put some ointment on it and it went away, but it returned a few days later and kept returning for a week or two. After that I was nauseated for two weeks straight and had abdominal pain, as if GERD and heavy Acid reflux for about 2 and a half weeks feeling like vomiting all the time. I couldnt eat because of this nausea. I noticed little lymph nodes in crotch area between my thigh and penis, the area in between. My armpits still hurt and I feel some swelling in my neck with a little pain. All this happened about 3 weeks ago and I still feel lymph nodes in my neck, and armpit, and some twitching where groin lymph nodes are located. I try to keep a cool head but it is hard to stay calm and avoid anxiety when introduced to this. I am in the 7th week after exposure. What do you think Doc; I know youre a pro thats why I am asking!

Youre a BraveHEART!!!!

MED STUD FROM NYC!

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Med Stud from NYC,

You want my assistance to shut your professor up??? Hmmm . . . that could be quite a challenge. Most professors never ever shut up.

I can advise you that there is no scientific documentation to validate his claims that (1) adults will definitely be infected by ingesting breast milk from a lactating HIVer "still in the 3-6 month window period" whether they drink a little or a lot and (2) infected breast milk can transmit HIV by getting into the eyes of an uninfected individual.

In fact, there are no reported cases of adult HIV transmission via breast milk. However, since this clearly does happen in newborn infants, it remains at least a theoretical risk for adults as well. I'll reprint one of my archival posts below.

Your "symptoms" are not suggestive of or worrisome for HIV disease.

If you're worried, get a single HIV rapid test at the three-month mark to put any residual fears permanently to rest.

As for your professor, he can "stand by his statements," but that doesn't make them scientifically accurate or valid. You might ask him to produce some documentation to back up his claims.

Stay well. Study hard.

Dr. Bob

THANKS A BILLION - DR. BOB May 1, 2003

DR. BOB,

THANKS A BILLION FOR UR VALUABLE RESPONSE. YES UR GUESS IS CORRECT, MY IST LANGUAGE IS NOT ENGLISH. SORRY FOR THE INCONVENIENC.

I HAVE STILL ONE DOUBT THAT, HAVE U CONSIDERED THE CHANCE OF GETTING BREAST MILK IN TOUCH WITH PENIS TIP ? WILL IT CAUSE ANY INFECTION ? HOWEVER FOR UR READY REFERENCE I AM ATTACHING MY EARLIER MAIL FOLLOWED BY UR REPLY ALSO ? THIS IS JUST FOR RECONFIRMATION ? PLS DON'T FEEL IRRITATED. I HAVE FULL FAITH ON U . AFTER RECEIVING UR MAIL I AM LITTLE BIT RELAXXED . CAN I DO WOOO HOOO ! WITHOUT ANY TEST ?

THANKS A LOT FOR UR KIND CO-OPERATION U EXTEND TO PEOPLE ALL OVER THE PEOPLE.I AM IN TREMENDOUS MENTAL TRAUMA, PLS HELP ME. IN BRIEF MY STORY IS

1) ON 30/05/01 I HAVE GONE THROUGH A SURGERY.

2) ON 21/10/01 I HAD JAUNDICE. & IT IS TESTED THAT I HAVE HEPATITIS B (NO SEXUAL RELATION WITH ANYBODY TILL NOW)

3) ON 14/08/02 I HAVE TESTED FOR HEPATITIS B , & IT WAS NEGATIVE.

4) ON 28/12/02 I MET WITH A PROSTITUTE. I MUSTERBATED KEEPING MY PENIS (BARE) AT THE MID OF TWO BREASTS & EJACULATED. AFTER THIS I MOLESTED HER BREASTS. I FOUND MILK IS COMING OUT (5-6 DROPS)WHEN IT IS PRESSED VERY FARMLY. I HAD TAKEN THIS MILK ON MY PALM & WIPED IT OUT ON BED. AFTER THIS (APPROX. 3 MIN. LATER)I MUSTERBATED IN THE SAME FASHION AS STATED EARLIER.THIS TIME NO EJACULATION. THIS IS ALL. I HAD NO OTHER SEXUAL RELATIONSHIP WITH ANYBODY.

5) ON 07/01/03 I TESTED FOR HIV & HBV - BOTH WERE NEGATIVE.

MY QUESTIONS ARE

1) HOW MUCH () I AM IN RISK OF AFFECTING HIV?

2) SHOULD I GO FOR HIV TEST?

3) WILL IT BE CONCLUSIVE TO TEST AT THIS TIME .(AFTER 105 DAYS OF EXPOSURE)

4)HOW MUCH RELIABLE IS "TOOL KIT TEST"

PLS GIVE ME RESPONSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. I AM IN TREMENDOUS MENTAL TRAUMA.

Hello,

You "molested" her breasts? And then found milk coming out when you pressed very "farmly." Dear Sir, these are not the kind of mammaries that require milking (as on a "farm"). Let me guess that English is not your first language (I hope). OK, on to your questions:

1. Risk for HIV: none. 2. Should you go for an HIV test? No. You did not have a significant risk. 3. Would an HIV test be conclusive 105 days after exposure? Yes. HIV tests are considered conclusive 3 months after a potential exposure (or, in your case, non-exposure might be more accurate). 4. "Tool Kit Test" I have no idea what this is. Sorry. But as I mentioned above you really dont need any HIV testing. Now as for whether or not you need a tool kit, I have no idea.

Hope this relieves your mental trauma.

Dr. Bob

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

Welcome back to the forum. I think your English is improving. Breast milk on the penis? My, you really did "molest" those breasts, didnt you? Relax. You are fine. This is not a risk for acquiring HIV. Stay well.

Dr. Bob

question not in archive: hiv from titty fuck? May 10, 2007

was at a strip joint and me and stripper went into a private room. she pulled my pants down and took off her top and bra, and she let me titty fuck her. is this a risk for HIV transmission as hiv is found in breast milk?

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

The HIV risk from your activities in the private room at the Badda Bing is nonexistent. Yes, HIV can be found in breast milk, but I strongly doubt Mr. Happy was suckling like a hungry infant while your private dancer was doing the shimmy-shimmy. Relax, Max. You're fine.

Dr. Bob



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