Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
   
Ask the Experts About

Safe Sex and HIV PreventionSafe Sex and HIV Prevention
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Possible Occupational Exposure?
Oct 22, 2007

Hi Dr. Frascino, I'm in my first semester of nursing school and already into clinical rotations. I came in contact with a patient who was diagnosed as "failure to thrive" with classic symptoms of AIDS, although AIDS/HIV was not documented in his chart. I did not wear gloves as I was examining him and do not remember if he was bleeding. He had a lot of dark red/purple discoloration on his legs and it was dark in the room so I could not tell if he was bleeding. Next I did something stupid. I left the room and don't remember if I washed my hands. I sat down to fill out my assessment of him and picked my lip until it bled pretty bad (nervous habit and no chapstick). Obviously, my hands weren't dripping in blood and I wasn't doing an invasive procedure, but even a small amount of his blood in my lip wound would be enough to at least be a cause for concern. 4 days later, I get a sore throat that sticks around for about 5 hours and goes away. Now I don't know what to think. Other than my occupation, I live a very low HIV risk life. I'm married and faithful, never in my life did any drugs. I apologize in advance for posting under the subject "Questions about safe sex and HIV prevention" since my issue has nothing to do with this but I had a difficult time navigating to the right area on this website. Any feedback would be appreciated! I'm worried sick!!

-Siana

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Siana,

"Failure to thrive" and "HIV/AIDS" are two very different illnesses. Next, your nervous lip picking is a bad habit. I suggest you stop and carry ChapStick instead! Your HIV risk from the activity you describe is nonexistent. However, now that you are beginning your clinical rotations it's essential you learn "universal precautions for bloodborne pathogens" (HIV, hepatitis). This information should have been mastered before you began your clinical rotations! Talk to your instructors if you haven't yet been thoroughly instructed on these precautions, OK?

Good luck!

Dr. Bob



Previous
travel & food with Novir
Next
I use the same bathroom as an HIV infected person

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement