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Thank you and information requiered
May 26, 2006

Dr. Franscino

I am a 4th yr medical student here in USA, who by all means need to not only thank you this site for the information provided in this website, but also I need to admit that there's more about HIV prevention and treatment that I really dont know.

I have been ask several times about the posibility of getting HIV from oral sex, curiously by people that are receiving what we called in lame terms "blow job". I have been searching the web for concrete information about this matter, after all I want to give my future patients accurate information. This website help me a lot to clarify certains doubts, still, I just want to make sure, oral sex without a barrier is a risk factor to contract HIV, at lower rate than penetration...but who is at more risk a person who gets the "blow job" or the person who is receiving it?

If you can clarify that doubt for me I will be more than greatful, and please can you refer me to another webs with consise information about HIV?

Thank you for your attetion and cooperation, sincerely; Elias

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Elias,

I'm glad you are searching out accurate information to pass on to others! Your assumption that oral sex is much less risky than penetration sex is right on target.

Also, no matter what type of sex oral, vaginal or anal the receptive partner (the one who gets spunked) is always more at risk that the insertive partner (the one sticking it in). For oral sex, for instance, the estimated per-act risk of acquiring HIV from unprotected receptive oral sex with a partner confirmed to be HIV positive is 1 per 10,000 exposures. That estimated risk decreases to 0.5 per 10,000 exposures for the insertive partner.

Regarding Web sites with concise information about HIV, how about this one? TheBody.com! You can find just about anything you need here and on its related links. Check it out!

Dr. Bob



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