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Percentage Risk for Cum in Eye Exposure
May 14, 2006

Dear Dr. Bob

I greatly appreciate this forum and your thoughtful, educated responses to questions. I have learned a lot, including I am not alone with a deep paranoia of contracting HIV while my risks are minimal.

The majority of sex I have is oral, which almost never includes letting the other guy cum in my mouth. Most of the time it is on my face; when it is in my mouth, I immediately spit. I know this risk is very low (although my paranoid state often has me thinking otherwise.)

Recently, I was with a man of unknown status and having a great suck session when he pulled out and shot on my face.

A large amount of his cum went into my eye. For those who have not had this happen, it hurts worse than Kerry losing in the last election.

From archive responses, I see that while this is a theoretic risk, there have not been documented cases of infection this way (is this correct?)

I also read one response you posted to a young lady in 2005 that says ... "Assuming the spunker was HIV positive, the estimated risk of acquiring HIV following a mucous membrane exposure is 0.09%."

Is this percentage among 10,000 cases, like the percentages I see attributed to oral exposure? How is this risk in line with oral sex?

Of course, my HIV paranoia has my mind reeling until the 30 day mark when I can first test, and up to the 3 month mark.

I'm counting down the calendar for that as much as I am the 2008 election when we can duely elect Hillary to the White House.

Knowing some numbers and a word from you would greatly help.

By the way, not exclusive to you answering my question but because I respect you and the work you do, I have made a $100 donation to www.concertedeffort.org.

Also, some karma good vibes for a neg test would be appreciated.

Sincerely,

Cumming Soon To An Eye Near You

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

Here's the scoop. The eye is lined with a mucous membrane. HIV-infected fluids coming into contact with mucous membranes do pose a risk for possible HIV transmission. There is evidence of health care workers who have become infected as a result of getting HIV-infected blood in their eye. However, there are no documented cases I'm aware of of folks having seroconverted after being eye-spunked. The estimated statistical risk is so small that we really can't put a number on it. At this point the best we can say is that there is a very small, but not completely nonexistent, theoretical risk.

Try not to worry. The odds are astronomically in your favor that you did not contract HIV from this bullseye hotshot.

Thanks for your donation! It's urgently needed and warmly appreciated. On behalf of the many lives that will be touched by your generosity, please accept my heartfelt thanks. I'm sending my very best good-luck/good-health karma that your three-month definitive HIV test will be negative (as I strongly suspect it will indeed be!) I'll also be sending a letter of acknowledgement and a small token gift of appreciation for your tax-deductible donation.

Good luck.

Dr. Bob



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