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second indeterminate result after 3 months how rare is this?
Apr 27, 2006

I have read many responses with regards to indeterminate results but I find conflicting information when it comes to time frames. I tested reactive elisa and indeterminate WB after an encounter with receptive oral from a person of unknown hiv status. I was called in for a retest 4 weeks later because of this result, so that would put this test at the 3 month marker and I got those results back as being the same. I have just finished my 6 month test and am anxiously awaiting the results... I was experiencing fatigue... a rash and swollen glands at the time of the first test (2 months after possible exposure), 1) is it true that most people would have seroconverted on the 2nd test. and 2) what risk level would be associated with getting infected from inserting a finger with a hang nail.. or something along those lines...into an infected persons vagina?

I notice a few people saying that indeterminates most likely lead to positive results.. while others say that low risk people may be stable indeterminate.. just how common is this really?

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello,

1. Yes, this is true for most people, but not all.

2. Without active bleeding, the risk would not be considered significant.

3. People with indeterminate WBs who are in the process of seroconverting usually have positive WBs within one month. Rarely, folks will continue to show indeterminate results. The cause of this is often not established. However, these folks are HIV negative when tested by more sensitive assays. If your serologic tests are again indeterminate, I would recommend a DNA-PCR assay. If necessary, an HIV/AIDS specialist well-versed in HIV testing techniques will be able to help confirm your status.

Dr. Bob



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