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re: Can I have a child - ORAQUICK WAS NEGATIVE?!?
Sep 30, 2005

Hi Dr Bob,

Following your advice I went and got an Oraquick 20 minute rapid test done and it came back NEGATIVE. My doctor got me to do it again and it came back NEGATIVE again. He says that it is most likely that my very first result was a false positive like you said. But he has taken my blood and is running an ELISA and Western Blot to confirm the Oraquicks since he says this is standard procedure.

In your opinion what is my HIV status? How much infection was there through blood transfusions back in the 80's? I am so glad you got me to re test.

I'll write back hopefully with a WOOHOO!

Thanks ANNE

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Anne,

Excellent news! I couldn't be happier for you!

Regarding OraQuick, a negative test is considered definitive and conclusive. (Positive tests need to be confirmed with ELISA and Western Blots before they are considered definitive true positives).

What is your HIV status? You are HIV negative. I have no doubt whatsoever.

Yes, there were some cases of blood transfusion-related HIV transmission in the early 80s before the HIV-antibody test was developed. For an account of this and other issues early in the epidemic try reading Randy Shilts's book, "And the Band Played On."

What is most unfortunate in your case is that you were led to believe you were HIV positive. This should not have happened. Physicians and testing sites should be aware of the possibility of false-positive test results, especially in folks like you who have minimal to no potential risk.

WOO-HOO, Anne!

Congratulations! (I'll post your original question below for our readers.)

Stay well.

Dr. Bob

Can I have a child? Sep 24, 2005

Hi,

I found out that I was HIV+ a week ago. I was born in 1983 and recently found out that I received multiple blood transfusions when I was born. My doctor says that I must have got HIV from these transfusions since I am a virgin and never used drugs, and that due to my normal CD4 count after 22 years that I am a non - progressor. Is he correct? My mother died during the birth and my father, well, disappeared shortly after my conception I suppose. My CD4 count is 750 and my VL is <50 copies. I found out when I tried to donate blood. I like to have children in the near future. Am I correct in saying that my child will get HIV for sure since he / she will be getting my infected blood?

Regards

ANNE

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Anne,

If your only HIV risk factor is blood transfusions from 1983, and your CD4 count is normal (750) and viral load, undetectable (<50 copies), the very first thing that needs to be done is to repeat your HIV test. It's possible your initial test was a false positive. Next, if you are indeed HIV positive and decide to have children, no, you are not correct in assuming your kids will be HIV positive. In fact, if you have proper HIV and obstetrical care, there is an excellent chance your children will be HIV negative. You can read more about this in the archives or we can discuss it at a later date. For now, first things first. Repeat your HIV test and let's more definitively determine your HIV status, O.K.?

Good luck.

Dr. Bob



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