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Unsafe in foam
Jul 26, 2005

Hello Robert

Two days ago while on my vacation in Ibiza I was at a foam party in a dance club. Unfortunately I got so excited about the slippery body contacts that I let a man enter his penis in my rectum without a condoim for a short time in the middle of this foam packed dancefloor. I know that this was unsafe and I am very scared and feeling very guilty about it. My question is: did the slippery foam around reduce or even increase the risk of a hiv transmission? Thanks for answering and keep up your great work! Best wishes, Pit

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi Pit,

Ibiza soapy-suds foam parties for "dirty" boys . . . hmmm . . . what fun! However, suds or no suds, unsafe sex is unsafe sex. The bubbles would neither increase nor decrease your HIV-transmission risk from unprotected receptive anal sex. The estimated per-act risk for receptive anal sex is 50 per 10,000 exposures to an infected source. Your estimated risk would be less, as we do not know the status of your slippery Ibizan bubble boy. A three-month HIV test is warranted. And don't forget to wear your rubbers when wading into fun foam. Rubbers will make sure you don't slip up, so to speak.

Good luck.

Dr. Bob



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