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Read Archives still concerned Blood Donation
Apr 17, 2005

Dr. Bob,

Thank you for being here. I've learned a lot over the last 3 days. I'm rather stressed over the letter I recieved after my blood donation.

I've been married and we both have been faithful for 15 years and I have 4 healthy children. In Feb 2004 my husband & I had an Elisa as part of a Life Insurance exam. We did not recieve the results and the company approved us so I assume it was negative. Neither my husband or I have engaged in risky behavior so there can't be any possible exposure in the past year.

Last month I gave blood and recieved a letter with the results stating the results were inconclusive. The results were all negative except for the HIV Tests. The results were:

HIV1/HIV2 POS, anti-HIV1 EIA NA, anti-HIV2 EIA NEG, HIV1 Western Blot Confirmatory Test IND Band Pattern p51 = 1+; p55= 1+. Nucleic Acid Test Multiplex for HIV/HCV NEG

The Red Cross counsler said it was what they call a false positive and there was something funky with the the test. Being a wreck I talked to my Dr and the look on his face made me feel worse. Especially when he said he agreed with the Red Cross person but to get tested again in 3 mo to make for sure. He said he had no experience with false positives until a lady who just had a baby had one. My last child was 8 years ago.

I'm going through calming down then getting all worked up again and had to ask you after reading related posts.

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

Add me to the growing list that totally agrees with the Red Cross counselor! Your test results are most indicative of a false-positive ELISA with indeterminate Western Blot. You have essentially no risk and your Western Blot band pattern is not what we usually see with HIV seroconversion. Anti-p24 is generally the first antibody to appear. For peace of mind you can repeat your antibody test in three months or get a PCR now. Patients in low-risk categories with indeterminate Western Blots are almost never infected with either HIV-1 or HIV-2.

Focus on the "calming down." I see no reason for "getting all worked up." Reviewing the archives will provide you with testimonials from other folks who have had similar experiences, all of which had happy endings, I might add. I'm quite confident yours will be as well!

Dr. Bob



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