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Severe nausea after exposure to Bush speech...
Jun 6, 2004

...could this be a sign of ARS, or even worse things like mind-conversion to republican? ^^ Ok, second question: I've got chlamydia, and I think the third course of antibiotics hasn't killed them off. I have already asked my urologist whether this could be a sign of me being immunocompromised, and he responded that my fears were "nonsense", claiming that treatment-resistant chlamydia were not a presenting sign of AIDS. I have a feeling, however, that this doctor in fact thinks that AIDS is not worth serious consideration as a cause of my problem simply because I'm a non-IDU heterosexual and thus not obviously a member of a "high-risk population", so I would greatly appreciate a second opinion on that. I have also decided to get tested for HIV on monday next week in order to either confirm that I have an HIV problem or to prove that what I have cannot be AIDS. My last potential exposure has now been ten weeks ago, so I understand the test has no chance of proving that I don't have HIV, but a negative result, which I still HOPE for, although I cannot make myself believe that this will be what I will get, certainly would prove I cannot have serious HIV-induced immune defects, wouldn't it? Also, I'm considering to go directly to a testing lab instead of visiting the community testing center, because with the former, I could get the results the same day, and if indeed I am immunodeficient already, I feel that every hour might count. However, turning to the lab directly would mean that i would have to pay for the test myself, which would be a significant drawback because being a student still I'm tight on money generally - so I wouldn't want to do this unless there really is reason to suspect that I'm suffering from an advanced stage of HIV infection and that, hence, getting diagnosed quickly would matter now. On this issue, your opinion would also be greatly appreciated :).

Good luck in November, BentFour

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello Bent Four,

First off, severe nausea after exposure to a Bush speech is a completely normal and expected response for all people with an I.Q. above the idiocy level.

Republicans mind-conversion . . . yes, I suppose it's possible. We're looking into that. It's kind of like a Stephen King horror novel where NASCAR Dads are melded with Children of the Corn at an NRA gun rally.

Next, I agree with your urologist: an isolated stubborn case of chlamydia is not an indication of a deficient or compromised immune system.

If you've placed yourself at risk for STDs, then go ahead and get an HIV test at three months. Testing prior to three months will not give definitive results. I see absolutely no reason to expedite the test results. You definitely are not "suffering form an advanced state of HIV." Don't panic. I very strongly doubt HIV is your problem!

I suggest the following:

1. Stay calm; continue to work with your urologist to clear up the chlamydia problem.

2. HIV test three months after the potential exposure.

3. Stay safe in the future to avoid future worries of STDs, including HIV.

4. Stay away from NRA rallies.

5. Vote for Kerry in November and boot the nausea-inducing Dubya back to Crawford Texas.

I think if you follow these simple steps, all will turn out well.

Dr. Bob



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