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NYU DR said Genital Herpes from receiving BJ
Jul 3, 2003

I have been a long time reader here. Thx for all the help and advice.

I just read in Maxim magazine that quoted a DR from NYU as saying it is quite possible to get genital herpes (and herpes simplex) from receiving a blow job.

Damn, I was under the impression that it was very unlikely if not improbable to get genital herpes that way. But the magazine made it sound like almost a sure thing.

Please clear this up and give me some indication of the risk factor of getting genital herpes on my dick from someones mouth.

Response from Mr. Kull

I haven't read the article, but I'll be sure to look it up. Thanks for keeping me up to date!

I don't know if I'd call oral to genital transmission of herpes is a "sure thing," but it can and does happen. There are two types of herpes simplex virus (HSV) that are categorized as HSV-1 and HSV-2. HSV-1 generally causes what are commonly known as cold sores or fever blisters: those uncomfortable, sometimes painful bumps you get around your mouth that are like blisters that scab over. HSV-2 generally causes what is commonly known as genital herpes. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 are attracted to the skin and mucous membranes around and in the mouth and the genital region. The virus doesn't particularly care if it lives in the neighborhood of the mouth or the genitals, as long as it has some place to hang out and cause problems. So, a person with HSV-1 or 2 lesion on their mouth could transmit that to the penis of a person they are performing oral sex on, and vice-versa.

Herpes simplex virus is spread through skin-to-skin contact. Active lesions can be quite contagious, so it is important to avoid contact with the lesions on person who is experiencing an outbreak. Some infected people may "shed" the virus without symptoms about 1% of the time, possibly transmitting the virus without having any symptoms.

For more information about herpes, you can call the National Herpes Hotline at (919)361-8488.

RMK



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