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The real story on Oral Sex
Jan 14, 2003

A big hello to all the team! Angels on earth is what you are!

My question: What is the real story with insertive oral sex (receiving fellatio)?

My local GAY/HIV community center says that not enough research was done to classify this activity as extremely low risk (theoretical risk only). They recommend the use of condoms. Is this marketing? I mean are they just saying that to make sure both individuals prone the use of latex?

Many web sites mention testimonies of people who claimed they were infected by receiving oral sex. Are these people liars?

The CDC says not one single case as been reported (except for the biting incident). Who is right and who is wrong? These are life changing choices. Please help.

Response from Mr. Kull

I agree, it's tough to figure out. In this case, there are no right or wrong answers. We can only work from the information that we have.

1) You can't say that there is no risk involved to the insertive partner in oral sex (the one whose genitals it is). There is potential mucous membrane exposure to fluids, which means that risk must be considered.

2) The CDC has no documentation of transmission occurring through oral sex.

3) Saliva is not known to transmit HIV. This is clear in both laboratory and human studies. The saliva of HIV infected people just doesn't seem to pose a real risk for transmission. We don't see transmission through kissing, casual contact with saliva (sharing glasses, etc.), or insertive oral sex. See Saliva as a barrier.

4) If you feel insecure about the information available, you can always use a condom during oral sex to virtually eliminate the already negligible risk involved in insertive oral sex.

RMK



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