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STDs related to receiving fellatio
Dec 18, 2002

Hi and Happy Holidays to everyone at "The Body". You are doing a fantastic job at both informing people on how to reduce their risk and stress when it comes to sex, an important part of life.

My question is concerning one single episode of unprotected fellatio (received). Im not a very active person sexually, and always wear a condom (with this single exception). Knowing the risk of HIV transmission in this case was extremely low to inexistent, I did not use a condom but forgot about all the other possible diseases. With all the emphasis put on HIV/AIDS we tend to forget about the rest big mistake. I will make sure this never happens again.

Unfortunately what is done is done and I am now facing this situation.

From my understanding, although many diseases can be transmitted this way, my main risk is herpes and if the giver didnt have any lesions or cold sores on his mouth that risk is greatly reduced.

Should I get tested for anything in your opinion or are the odds so low that I should only get tested if symptoms appear. I just got tested for everything imaginable prior to this event and all came out negative. What are the windows for testing (other than HIV).

PS I cleaned my penis right after the fellatio and did not notice any cuts, bruises, or blood on my penis.

Response from Mr. Kull

Screening for STIs every time a person has a sexual encounter is definitely not recommended. This is especially true when an encounter is low-risk. If you begin to experience symptoms that might be indicative of an STI, see a doctor.

STI screening on a routine basis is only indicated for certain populations, such as women of reproductive age or people at significant risk for STIs, like men who have sex with men. However, decisions to screen are much more complex than this (it's as much art as science), so you really should communicate with your doctor about the appropriate procedures for you.

RMK



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